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Dictionary > phrases

    Here's a quick overview with translations. For family, examples and more check the details.
  • *gagina
    (phrase)
    1.
    against, toward
    (This is a Germanic root and there are no known connections beyond it. It's the origin of "again" and "against".)
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  • *pri-
    (phrase)
    1.
    "love"
    (This root shifted toward the idea of friendship and freedom in several Indo-European languages. In Slavic for example "prija.." is a stem for "friend". Notable English members are "free", "friend" and also... "filibuster". )
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  • *sag-
    (phrase)
    1.
    to track, to seek
    (Notable English members of that root are "to seek", "to ransack" and "sake". In many Germanic languages, it has developed a branch that's about arguing and dispute. That's where the German "Sache" comes from, which originally was "matter of discussion".)
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  • *wer-(2)
    (phrase)
    1.
    covering
    (Notable English members of this family are cover, curfew, garment, guarantee, weir and warn and the Latin family around "un"-cover with words like overt, discover and apperitif.)
    Value: coming soon
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  • 110
    (phrase)
    1.
    police emergency
    (Call the police in an emergency. Works in Germany)
    Value:
    Opposite: 112
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  • 112
    (phrase)
    1.
    emergency number
    (Call firefighters or ambulance, works throughout the EU)
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    Opposite: 110
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  • 2024
    (phrase)
    1.
    2024
    (Please leave a comment here why you searched for this. I want to understand.)
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  • 420
    (phrase)
    1.
    cringe number
    (Used to be a code for weed, then a meme and then Elon and his fanboys filled it to the brim with cringe-vibes.)
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  • ab und zu
    (phrase)
    1.
    every now and then
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  • ab wann
    (phrase)
    1.
    starting when?
    (Asks for the moment that something starts. Can be about the future or about some sort of threshhold.)
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  • abgesehen von
    (phrase)
    1.
    besides, aside from, apart from
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  • abgesehen davon
    (phrase)
    1.
    apart from that, that aside
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  • abhanden kommen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to get lost, to disappear
    (In the sense of something really getting lost. Sounds high register.)
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  • Ablage P
    (phrase)
    1.
    the bin, "repository P"
    (Colloquial, pseudo-formal term for the "repository Papierkorb", which is the trashbin. Used to be common in the office world, but on the decline because of computers.)
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  • Abschied nehmen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to say farewell
    (Sounds epic and often used in contexts where someone does internal work, rather than actually saying farewell to someone. Like, sitting and meditating over the loss for example.)
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  • Abstriche machen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to make concessions
    (Though the noun doesn't mean that anymore, the idea of the phrase comes from the notion of crossing things off a list because you can't have them)
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  • Abwarten und Tee trinken.
    (phrase)
    1.
    Wait and see.
    Value:
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  • Ach echt?
    (phrase)
    1.
    Oh really ?
    (very common in conversations)
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  • Ach Gott!
    (phrase)
    1.
    Oh no! / Geez!
    (Used to express a negative surprise.)
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  • Ach komm.
    (phrase)
    1.
    Come on.
    (The actual meaning depends a lot on tone.)
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  • Ach Quatsch.
    (phrase)
    1.
    Oh come on, nonsense.
    Value:
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  • achtgeben (auf)
    (phrase)
    1.
    to be careful, to take care, to pay attention
    (Mostly has an undertone of being careful, so it's as common in the sense of paying attention to mere information. Also spelled "Acht geben" sometimes.)
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  • alle sein
    (phrase)
    1.
    be empty, be out of stock
    Value:
    2.
    be exhausted
    (You're "empty" basically.)
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  • allem Anschein nach
    (phrase)
    1.
    by all appearances
    (a rather likely version of "to seem". More for written German)
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  • alles andere als
    (phrase)
    1.
    anything but
    (In the sense of "This is all kinds of things... but NOT X")
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  • Alles gut?
    (phrase)
    1.
    How are you?
    (small talk, not an actual question for friends)
    Value:
    2.
    Are you okay?
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  • Alles gut!
    (phrase)
    1.
    Don't worry. All good.
    Value:
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  • Alles Gute!
    (phrase)
    1.
    Take care! /Good luck!
    (When saying good bye. Sounds a bit old school.)
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    2.
    Congratulations!
    (ONLY for birthday or name day or maybe the new year. NOT for passing an exam or something similar. There needs to be something "starting".)
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  • alles in allem
    (phrase)
    1.
    all in all
    Value:
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  • alles Übrige
    (phrase)
    1.
    all the rest, the details
    (usually in context of "remaining part of discussion" and sounds a bit formal. Colloquially, you'd say "der Rest")
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  • alles Weitere
    (phrase)
    1.
    everything else, the rest
    (formal)
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  • als ob
    (phrase)
    1.
    as if
    Value:
    2.
    "Yeah, right!"
    (as an exclamation of disbelief)
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  • als wenn
    (phrase)
    1.
    as if
    (Pretty much a synonym to "als ob" but not as common in daily life.)
    Value:
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  • Alter Schwede!
    (phrase)
    1.
    Duuude! Daaang.
    (Pretty common way to express that you're really impressed or shocked. Please don't overuse it, though. That'll be cringe.)
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  • am besten
    (phrase)
    1.
    the best
    (As the ultimate form of "gut")
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    2.
    best would be
    (Usually in the beginning of a sentence)
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  • am liebsten
    (phrase)
    1.
    ideally, as a favorite
    (ONLY works in combination with a verb... so "am liebsten machen/tun/haben...". It's the most-version of "gern")
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  • am Wochenende
    (phrase)
    1.
    on the weekend
    Value:
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  • an den Tag legen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to show
    (Only for people showing some quality or characteristic.)
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  • an der Nase herum führen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to trick someone
    (minor kinds of fraud)
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  • an die Decke gehen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to go through the roof
    (in the sense of being REALLY angry)
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  • an eine Zigarette ziehen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to take a drag off a cigarette
    Value:
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  • angewiesen sein auf
    (phrase)
    1.
    to be dependent on
    (In the sense of needing something, but NOT for drugs.)
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  • Anteil nehmen an
    (phrase)
    1.
    to sympathize with/ to feel for someone
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  • Arbeitslosengeld beziehen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to be on welfare
    Value:
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  • Ärger kriegen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to be scolded, to get in trouble
    (Someone letting their anger out at you, usually for a good reason.)
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  • Ärger machen
    (phrase)
    1.
    to make trouble, to stir up conflict
    Value:
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  • Ass im Ärmel
    (phrase)
    1.
    ace up the sleeve
    Value:
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  • auch nicht
    (phrase)
    1.
    neither
    ((as in "Me neither."))
    Value:
    Opposite: auch
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  • auf Anhieb
    (phrase)
    1.
    right away, on the first attempt
    (When you try something and it succeeds immediately.)
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  • auf Dauer
    (phrase)
    1.
    for/on the long haul
    (Mainly used for contexts where something would be an issue if it was the permanent solution.)
    Value:
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