Conditional in German – Work Out

Hello everyone,

and welcome back to our mini series on Conditional in German. And if you thought you’re just gonna calmly sit there and read something then you’re gravely mistaken.
Because today, we’ll hit the gym and do this:

Non Past Conditional – XFit Full Body Workout
**intense** #flatabs 

In part one and two we’ve learned about the non-past conditional and today we’ll put that into practice.
If you haven’t read part one and two, you can find them here (and no, part one isn’t “just” and overview. You need it!!)

Conditional Pt. 1 – An Overview

Conditional Pt. 2 – The Real Conditional

Of course you can also try this exercise, if you haven’t read the articles. But don’t whine if you fail.
Cool.

So here’s what we’ll do:

I’ll give you a “normal” statement in German and you’ll have to take it and make it into a statement with Conditional.

The main part of that is of course making the right choice between Real Conditional and würde-Conditional and putting it into the sentence correctly.

  • Wenn ich Hunger habe, esse ich. (When I am hungry, I eat.)
  • Wenn ich Hunger hätte, würde ich essen. (If I were hungry, I’d eat.)

But there are a few more difficulties in there.
Uhm… hooray :)

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Conditional in German 2- The Real Conditional

Hello everyone,

and welcome to the second part of our look at what we  all love on hot summer days:

Air Conditional

Badum tish.
#worstpunever
Conditional is that could, should, would-stuff that’s officially called Konjunktiv II or Subjunctive, but we’re using a different name because YOLO!
In part one, we learned that the core function of Conditional  is to shift a statement away from reality and that the different uses are a result of that. Then, we got like a little overview over Conditional in German and then we learned how to build what we called würde-conditional; one of the two versions of the non-past conditional.
If you haven’t read it you really should start with that because it’s the foundation and you’d be a little confused without it. So here’s the link

Conditional in German – 1 – The beginning

Today, we’ll take a detailed look at the other version of the non-past conditional:

The Real Conditional

So let’s jump right in.

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Conditional in German – 1

Hello everyone,

and welcome back to the German is Easy – Grammar Course,  the course that Einstein mentioned in one of his most famous quotes…

“Nothing moves faster than light. But your progress
when you take the German is Easy course comes pretty close.”

Okay, he didn’t say that.
But I’m pretty sure he would have, had he not destroyed the time machine he had built after Schrödinger’s cat had told him what would happen if he didn’t
( find out what Einstein saw, here).
Now you’re probably like  “Ugh… Emanuel is using his intro for shit posting again.” but NO! Not this time. This intro was super on topic because today, we’ll start our mini series about

Conditional in German

What I mean by that are all those phrasing like I would…, If I were you… or I could have had. Super important, useful stuff that we use every day and yet, learners are making lots of mistakes there; even at an advanced level. Which is weird, because the rules are actually pretty simple and straight forward.
In this mini series, we’ll go over all you need to know. And today, we’ll start with a little overview over the topic.
So would you have been ready to must have… uhmm…  had to could have had … uh… been jumped in…. erm… or something?
Great :)

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German Prepositions Explained – “zu” – Part Two

Hello everyone,

and welcome to the second part of our look at one of the most important words ever:

zu

Last time, we first talked about zu as a preposition. We found that it carries the idea of toward-ness and we learned the main groups of “destinations” zu works for: persons, occasions and activities.
So whenever you want to express that something is directed toward something that fits within these groups… zu is most likely the right choice.
Then, we turned toward about zu- as a verb prefix and even though it is bent and twisted, the core idea of toward-ness was still very clear.
“Uhm … Emanuel, actually it wasn’t really all that cl…”
IT WAS STILL CLEAR! #endofdebate
“Okay, okay… chill, bro.”
Then, we talked about how zu can also mean closed and how that’s actually very… ahem… close to the idea of toward and last but not least we learned that German spelling reform sucks and that Takumi’s final form is Swole-Takumi. But we never got to see his full power because of connection issues.
Oh and then there was like an endless list of zu-words at the end :).
If you want to check it out, you can find it here:

German Prepositions Explained – “zu” – Part One

Otherwise, let’s jump right into part two – with a look at those fixed preposition verb combinations like warten auf or wundern über…

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