Advent Calendar 2019 – Halt 2.0

 

“Halt 2.0”

Hello everyone,

welcome back to the German learning Advent Calendar, door number 18. And behind this door is kind of a little add on to an article that’s already on the site. I’m talking about the article on

the particle halt and its use

Because there’s something missing, that I think is really important. The article itself is fairly old and it definitely needs an overhaul because it’s too long and spends too much time on the verb halten. I wanted to do the rewrite for the calendar but then work got in the way and I can’t possible do that at the moment. Still, I wanted to share the missing bit, because it’s quite common and it kind of shows a character trait of millenial Germans.

So, the general gist of the article on halt was, that it is kind of a verbal shrug. People use it whenever something is NOT the “most desired option” but an alternative. How exactly to translate it or if it even should be translated heavily depends on tone, but this notion of a verbal shrug fits pretty well.
Here are two examples, just so you can see it in practice.

  • “Wir haben keinen Kaffee.”
    “Dann halt Tee.”
  • “We don’t have coffee.”
    “Meh… tea then.”
  • “Ich gehe.”
    “Mach halt.”
  • “I’ll leave.”
    “Well, do what you gotta do.”

Now, if you pay attention to Germans speaking you will notice that people, especially between 20 and 50, use halt a LOT. And not always is there an alternative setting, like an A or B thing, going on.
So what does the halt express in these cases?
At first, my interpretation was that people use it when they’re struggling to express themselves.

  • “Warum war das Date nicht cool?”
    “Es war halt irgendwie komisch.”
  • “Why wasn’t the date good?”
    “I don’t know… it was kind of strange.”

In that sense we actually do have an alternative. It’s the perfect way of expressing their thoughts. But they can’t do that, because they’re not Goethe, so they have to settle for the second best way. And halt kind of marks that in the sentence. Like… “This is kind of what I think, I don’t know how else to say it, though it’s not really precise.”
And based on that notion, we have a key to another trend that  I noticed. And this is what I want to eventually add to the article because it’s really important:

People use halt as an apologetic particle to subconsciously hedge their statements against direct confrontation.

Here’s an example… an employee complaining about having to do half an hour longer.

  • Ich wollte halt heute pünktlich nach Hause gehen.

The translation of it is “I wanted to go home on time” … WITH a little verbal shrug in it. And what is that little verbal shrug doing there?
Well, to me (and I have paid a lot of attention to how people use halt) it feels a bit like the person is apologetic about wanting to go home on time. Not in a sense of really feeling sorry for it, but in a sense that they FEEL like they should apologize or justify themselves.
They’re saying their opinion, but they put something else in there. An apology or justification for their opinion, thus making it less exposed to direct confrontation.
Let me try to show you in English…

  • I wanted to go home on time today.
  • I like… I kind of wanted to go home on time today, or whatever.

The first statement is a clear and upright statement. You stand up for what you want. The second version conveys the same message, but it’s hiding it. It’s weaseling around a bit, trying to avoid being confronted directly. A bit like

  • “These are my thoughts.”
  • “Don’t blame me for it, but these is my thoughts.”

Now, I did not do scientific research on this. This is really just my observation over the years, but I do feel like that Germans have a tendency to avoid clear statements and really sticking up for their opinion. You will hear a LOT of halts when people complain about something. Some are because they don’t know how to express themselves, and some are adding a pinch of “apologetic-ness” into the statement.
And it’s not the only way Germans “hide” in their statements. I’ll talk about another BIG one next year. But I feel like there’s a trend of people not making clear bold statements and preferring to make it wishy washy in some way, hedging it. Having a backdoor.

It’s nothing people do conscioulsy or with bad intend. It’s just a mind set of the society or generation, or whatever. And it’s very subtle. But I have halt (being apologetic here :)) caught myself many times using halt or another option and then mentally saying the same thing again without it to see how it feels. And it feels different. It feels more exposed.

Cool.
I’ll rework the article about halt and add some more examples for all this, but for today that’s all I wanted to share.
But I am super curious what you think. Those of you who have spent some time in Germany, have you noticed any of this? Do you think there’s something to my theory?
And am I even making any sense?
Let me know all your thoughts and feedback in the comments. Have a great day and bis morgen :)

for members :)

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Elsa
Elsa

Hiya,
I will “halt” correct your typos (apology here means I really aprreciate the effort you’re putting into doing this Advent Calendar for us and feel a bit guilty about correcting stuff, as it makes me feel I’m being ungrateful)
“millenial” (millennial)
“bad intend” (intent)
mindset is just the one word
Haven’t been to Germany for an extended period of time to notice the use of “halt”, but I will try and pay attention next time I go. On that topic, is it okay if I ask you two questions (nothing personal or indiscreet, it’s just something about German cities)?
Bis morgen!

Jinksy
Jinksy

It’s hilarious cos you misspelt “appreciate” in your first sentence. I am halt for noticing it!

aoind
aoind

I’d always thought of “halt” as a straight translation of “just” and interchangeable with “eben” and “nun mal” but perhaps it’s a bit narrower than that. Depending on the stress, “just” in a complaint can be quite forceful or it can be conciliatory whereas “halt” seems to be at the soft end.

“It’s just that I wanted to go home on time” is very conciliatory but still holds out hope for a concession.
“I just wanted to go home on time” recognises that that ship may have sailed but has a bitter feel to it.
“I just want to go home on time” is quite forceful and direct.

Elsa
Elsa

Gosh, it never occurred to me that the word “just” varied so much in meaning according to the other words around it… Of course you’re absolutely right in your meanings and it just goes to show Germans probably have as much of a hard time with the subtleties of the English language as we have with stuff like “halt” and particles such as “doch”, “mal”, etc.
“Halt” seems to be a bit like our “it’s just that…” and one could bat one’s eyelashes at the same time :)

Turtles
Turtles

I am not a native English speaker but I always thought that sth like

1) “It’s just that I wanted to go home on time” is sth that one would say if they are facing sth one annoyed/angry.

2) I just wanted to go home on time

I would have assumed this is like 1, but with difference being is the speaker is less passive and more confident

3) I just want to go home on time

This sounds to me like someone is mabye fed up with sth.

I was never taught about nuances and never knew about them until I started learning German. I caught on connotations for words such as “cheap” have a negative connotation though the dictionary might not reflect it ( and it’s even worse in more complex cases) . I kinda caught to filler words as well without really und what they are used for.

Elsa
Elsa

You’re a bit off on 1), it definitely doesn’t have a hostile vibe. The vibes are 1) conciliatory; 2) disappointed; 3) annoyed/assertive.
A whole chapter could be written on connotations for “cheap” (and words formed from cheap, such as cheapskate)!

Turtles
Turtles

1) I did not mean that speaker is hostile. I meant that person being spoken to is likely angry. It does not conflict what you are saying as “conciliatory” means “a trait of quelling anger”

2) I guess the idea of disappointment is a lil different from what I described

3) This dies fit with my idea of “fed up”

As for cheap, this is very true as it has a multitude of family words, but I specifically meant “cheap” vs “Economical”. One is definitely much more polite Ah my sweat delusion that i could do reasonable attempt at C2 English ( I can propably do well in the listening part though)

notpeanut
notpeanut

It depends on the pronunciation. If you stress “just”, it is more likely to sound annoyed. it means something like “only”, so it could have an annoyed sound if stressed. But if really unstressed, like ‘js’, with hardly any vowel, it’s a mitigator–it has that softening/conciliatory tone to it.

Turtles
Turtles

Well, how would these things be reflected in writing. An article? A journal? A movie script?

notpeanut
notpeanut

If someone wrote me an email and said “I was just wondering…” I would assume the mitigator usage. The “only” meaning works better if it’s in contrast to something implying that’s a lot. But they overlap in meaning anyway, so it’s not always clear. But if someone wanted to be clear that they’re expressing annoyance, they could indicate stress in writing in a number of ways, like JUST, or *just*, or using bolding or italics.

Turtles
Turtles

Nice language bits. Now we 2.0 the whole website and Yourdailygerman 2.0. Jk

Thank you for the article

Bis neunzehn

Ahmad Mazaheri
Ahmad Mazaheri

Ich dachte , dass die Partikel halt ist synonym von eben . Es gibt das gleiche auf Französich . Je voulait partir JUSTEMEMENT à temps à la maison . Hier der Sprecher ist verärgert, verhindert und ein bischen resigniert .
Aber habe ich eine Frage. Diese Partikel ist es betont in einen Satz oder nicht ? Hat sie die gleiche Aussprache wie der Halt ?
Im voraus danke .

Rohrkrepierer ‐ KOOK & HECKLER
Rohrkrepierer ‐ KOOK & HECKLER

Im Süden werden oft “nur” oder “mindestens” verwendet.
Halt kommt mir nicht so bekannt vor.

Elena Anastasaki
Elena Anastasaki

I fully agree with your theroy, I have been in Germany for 7 years now and I have noticed this use of halt very often at least were I live (Tübingen). I would translate it in English often with “just”, so to use your example: “I just wanted to go home on time today….”

Anonymous
Anonymous

Ich habe noch nicht genug Zeit in Deutschland, aber diese macht Sinn!
Camille

Jinksy
Jinksy

Great hint. I’ve never heard the “halt” but I wonder if I’ll hear it everywhere from now on!

notpeanut
notpeanut

very cool article! I hadn’t heard ‘halt’ like this before. But then, I haven’t been in Germany since 1991. :-(

Natalia Kulagina
Natalia Kulagina

To say it’s an interesting observation is a huge understatement. I find this article full of insights. As a Russian taking German tourists sightseeing in Saint Petersburg, Russia, I can say I’ve noticed a lot of apologetic behaviour the Germans show. Well, yes, because of WWII, obviously. But maybe these things are connected? Postwar trauma, manifesting itself in the language? I mean, look at German stand-up comedians. What they joke about? Being a German, feeling guilt, towards Jews, towards other nations… And also about feeling sick of feeling guilty. I’ve sensed it. So yes, the Germans do manifest guilt in their language, the halt-thing is an awesome example as I see it. Of course, can be just my vista)) Interesting though is that Russians, too, tend to apologise for expressing themselves)) Maybe that’s why I’m sensitive to these things. Some Russians, the 50-s, 60s, 70s., I’d say. On the practical note, shall I start using halt a lot on my German tours to make my tourists feel more at home?)))

fairyhedgehog
fairyhedgehog

I’m outside the age range of the people who use ‘halt’ most (I’m 65) so if I used it would I sound ridiculous? Is this something to recognise rather than to use?

I did find it very interesting – you do a good job of explaining. I’m still at an early stage with all those words that German uses to colour sentences. I find them fascinating but I wouldn’t like to have to formally translate them!

Pentatomidae
Pentatomidae

What a great article! It’s so hard to understand what actual real Germans are saying… all these particles. It’s never like the textbooks!

parisbongi
parisbongi

Ausgezeichnet! Natürlich höre ich jetzt halt oft … Ich werde genauer hinhören
The English translations vary between just, simply or only with the difference often being tone and facial expression.
Vielen Dank

Kika
Kika

I have never heard Halt because of my poor listening skill. I must have missed it. But…very interesting as there are many ‘halt’-ish expressions in my native tongue, Japanese. Japanese uses those expressions partly because they don’t want to hurt the others’ feelings, partly because they cannot make up their mind. I wonder why Germans use halt. I try to listen more carefully! Thank you!

Alan
Alan

Einhornfohlen: Mama, uns ist das Fleisch ausgegangen.
Mutter Einhorn: Dann musst du halt dieses Gemüse essen.

WasserNixen
WasserNixen

This article was very helpful. Just as the comments discuss “just” in English [see what I did there?], it often comes down to tone, intonation, and emphasis in English. I love that Germans can soften a request or opinion with the filler words–z.b., doch, noch, mal, bitte bitte mal, ja, na.. I have yet to find the over-50 Germans needing to soften their complaints or opinions, though. lol. Thanks for all you offer and share here. You are not “just” a Rock Star. ;-)

Jenni Carpathia
Jenni Carpathia

Its definitely a millennial thing. Us over 50s have a different speech pattern. Less tentative sounding. I first noticed this tendency emanating from California in the 1980s with what became known as Valley Girl speak…refer to Frank Zappa…now it’s perhaps morphed into mainstream speech tendencies in the next generations…just my €0.02.

Markt74
Markt74

In Vienna I hear “halt” quite often from the age group you mentioned. I sometimes throw it into the particle category similar to “just” in English. On a daily basis i hear “es ist halt so,” for example. I try to use it in an attempt to give what I say some flavor.

Alison Rostetter
Alison Rostetter

Nice to find a page with colloquial phrases that are hard to find in a normal dictionary. Well done. Halt gut gemacht.

SCviic
SCviic

You’ve noted that one way that English speakers do this apologetic thing is by using “like” as a filler. I do it myself and there’s an epidemic of it in the UK. I think it’s very similar.

Rob
Rob

Sounds like the best translation for “halt” is “kind of” – which you will hear a lot in American English, used to convey both slight imprecision and indirect, semi-apologetic non-confrontation.

nlvanallen
nlvanallen

I haven’t spent much time in Germany, certainly not enough to have any opinion on why Germans use “halt” so much (it would have slipped by me in conversation altogether), but it sounds like what I think of here (U.S.) as a Midwestern kind of thing. Softening one’s words to be less direct. And oh, I think another way you could translate the “I wanted to go home on time today” sentence would be “I sort of wanted to go home on time today.” Pretty much the same thing but that’s how I’d say it as a good Midwesterner.