Advent Calendar 20 – “All pulled together”

Hello everyone,

welcome back to our Advent Calendar; let’s see what we have behind door number 20… uh… it is… drumroll….

a family picture

Yup.
A family picture. You know… on Christmas families come together and they often take a family picture.
Well guys, it wasn’t easy but I was actually able to get my hands on last years family picture of… the Zug-family :).

Seriously, there are some families of words that are just crazy. In the regular articles, we don’t really have time to follow up on that, but it’s really fascinating. So I decided to make a little map of it, that shows which words are related and how they all more or less tie in with one original idea.

This one is for the family of ziehen and Zug and I am pretty sure there are some cool surprises in there.

This is the first of this kind I ever made,  and it’s really more a work in progress. So I’d really be interested in your feedback. Do you like these kinds of maps? Would you like more of these in the future? And are there things I can do better to make it more helpful?
Oh one thing though… I know you’re all like “Prefix versions!!” but there’s no way to include all the prefix versions of ziehen with all their translations. I tried but there are just too many with too many translations each. Maybe I’ll do an extra sheet on this some day. Or a card game ;)
Anyway, let me know your thoughts in the comments and enter the competition for today’s little giveaway.

Viel Spaß mit dem Familienfoto und bis morgen :)

(click the image or here to download the full size image) 

for members :)

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Niamhor
Niamhor

Oy vey!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Ausgezeichnete Wortkarte! Gute Arbeit!

berlingrabers

Cool! I had wondered about “Herzog” before, and now it definitely makes sense. This is a great idea, and I’d love to see more of these kinds of charts.

Jen
Jen

I love this!! Hope you make some more for other families :)

smallamfortas

I’ve been looking for a dictionary that does this for all words/common roots for the longest time.

Tony Mountifield

Wonderful! I love seeing how words are etymologically related (“cognates” from co-birth). More of these would be fascinating.

One small thing: “Schlagzeug” in English would be more commonly “drum kit” rather than “drum set”.

berlingrabers

Hmm, I don’t know about that… I’d use “set” and “kit” interchangeably and might even slightly prefer “set.” But that could definitely be one with a lot of regional variation.

Tony Mountifield

There seems to be a technical issue with posting comments from an iPad. I signed in with Facebook ok, and typed my comment, but when I clicked “Post Comment”, the “Leave a comment” section just completely disappeared without posting what I’d typed. I had to use my computer to post my comment above.

Ruth
Ruth

Can I place an order for the wallpaper? (Not the computer variety.)

evabara
evabara

Toll! Ich mag das Bild. Es erklärt sehr, wie die Wörter verfilzt sind und ich würde gerne mehr von diesen Bilder sehen! Wenn du lustige Zeichnungen oder Bilder dazugebe, denn würde es noch besser sein. :)

Jeff Wise

This is great. I’d like to see a similar explanation of the meaning of the verb prefix “ver-“. Keep up the good work!

katherinehlchan
katherinehlchan

Pdf links of your recent posts are not working. :(

Bavanek
Bavanek

Super idea would love more of these connections in the language as they clarify how it all wotks!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Facinating! It’s interesting to see how the English –duce and –duct words evolved from the root. I don’t think of English having prefix verbs, but there they are.

formaneka
formaneka

toll! Ich will dieses pdf tragen!

kareninmichigan
kareninmichigan

Sehr interessant! Toll! Weiter so.

Brightstar
Brightstar

Pictorial and colorful expressions enrich your posts as has the oral component.

I’d like to suggest cascading the content so drilling can be done on demand.
Level 1. Reduce the written content at the top level. A helicopter view concept
Level 1. Include audio for the pronunciation
Level 2. Add dynamic links to add further details, when required. That is, drilling down
Level 3. Use dynamic links to include examples on word usage, deeper drilling. Examples are very useful and they are not readily available in standard dictionaries.

Actually, it is the same post but layered. I think this style would increase access flexibility hence attracting more readers.

I love your post in any form :)

Eloise Smith

WOW! Vielen Dank! Faszinierend und sehr nützlich!!

lest skin unfolds

Brilliant, keep the good work. I love this :)

stick hitter
stick hitter

I agree about “drum set” being more common.

shill
shill

I kind of think Amazon is the devil, but have you considered doing that affiliate thing where you get money from recommending stuff? If you’re recommending books and stuff already….