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Dictionary > um (insep)s

    Here's a quick overview with translations. For family, examples and more check the details.
  • umarmen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to embrace, to hug
    (Needs a direct object, so you can not just say "Wir umarmen." in German.)
    Value:
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  • umfahren
    (um (insep))
    1.
    the drive around
    (In the sense of avoiding, not a tourist trip around a lake. The past is built with "haben" because this ALWAYS has a direct object (the thing you drive around).)
    Value:
    Opposite: umfahren
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  • umfangen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to surround, to envelop
    (VERY rare and barely ever idiomatic.)
    Value:
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  • umfassen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to grab around something
    Value:
    2.
    to include, to entail
    (Mostly in the sense of figurative contents)
    Value:
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  • umfliegen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to fly around
    (In the sense of avoiding. Think of a plane flying around a storm.)
    Value:
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  • umgeben
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to surround
    (NOT in a beleaguering sense. Implies a steady surrounding, so not for a transitory, quick surrounding. Also commonly used in contexts of surrounding yourself with something - "sich+Acc umgeben mit".)
    Value:
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  • umgehen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to go around, to avoid
    (Primarily used for figurative blockades like problems or challenges. Very common. The spoken past is built with "haben"!)
    Value:
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  • umhängen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to surround by hanging
    (Think of a balcony that is surrounded by hanging grape vines. Sounds very poetic and is not used in daily life.)
    Value:
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  • umhüllen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to enwrap, to coat with
    ("umhüllen mit" - think of completely wrapping or coating. Like a marzipan egg, coated with chocolate or a demon shrouded in mist.)
    Value:
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  • umkreisen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to circle
    (In a sense of moving in circles around. Can be with a pen, to make a marking, but also a pack of wolves circling the carcass of a unicorn. Always needs a direct object. )
    Value:
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  • umlesen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to read around
    (Technically, the word means that you read around something to avoid reading it. Like a paragraph for example. If you find a context for it, then great, but it's overall pretty rarely used.)
    Value:
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  • umreißen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to outline, to give a summary
    (Think of someone outlining a plan to give people a first impression, but without filling in the details.)
    Value:
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  • umschließen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to enclose, to surround
    (Sounds a bit poetic and it's not always idiomatic.)
    Value:
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  • umschreiben
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to paraphrase, to circumscribe
    (When you try to express or name something without saying it directly. )
    Value:
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  • umstehen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to stand around
    (In the literal sense of "standing around something". Super duper rare, except the use of "umstehende" people, for people standing around an incident.)
    Value:
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  • umsteigen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to climb around
    (Technically, this verb can express the idea of climbing around an obstacle, but in real life "umklettern" is probably people's first choice. )
    Value:
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  • umstellen
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to surround
    (For police and armies. NOT for trees surrounding a lake. Unless it's SWAT trees of course who want to apprehend the lake.)
    Value:
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  • umwerben
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to court, to canvass, to woo
    ("jemanden+Acc umwerben" - Trying really hard to win someone over. Think a really skilled worker.)
    Value:
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  • umwickeln
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to wrap (with)
    ("umwickeln mit" - the result of this verb is pretty much the same as for "einwickeln". You'd use this one if you want to put focus on the idea of "around".)
    Value:
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  • umzingeln
    (um (insep))
    1.
    to surround
    (ONLY in the sense of surrounding in order to trap! Related to English "cinch" and "surcingle")
    Value:
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