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Dictionary > (he)rauf verbs

    Here's a quick overview with translations. For family, examples and more check the details.
  • (d)raufgeben
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to give upward
    (The literal meaning of handing an object upward. Think of handing a screw driver to someone on a ladder. "hochgeben" is more idiomatic overall, I think.)
    Value:
    Opposite: runtergeben
    2.
    to put on top of
    (Can be "draufgeben" or "raufgeben". Think of asking an ice cream vendor if they can add some chocolate sirupe on top. Sounds a bit formal, though and "(d)raufmachen" is the more common choice.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)raufkriegen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to get up
    (In the sense of managing to move something up somewhere. Think of moving a heavy couch.)
    Value:
    2.
    to get on top
    (Very colloquial. Used in context of getting a topping on your food.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)raufsteigen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to get on (it), to climb on (it)
    (Getting or climbing onto a thing that has been established before. Can be a simple table or a bike. Rare for a mountain. More common in the sense of "stepping on", but that's regional. Either "rauf-" or "drauf-" but pretty much never "herauf-".)
    Value:
    Opposite: runtersteigen
    see details >
  • aufrunden
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to round up
    (ONLY in the sense of rounding up numbers. NOT for rounding up people, for example.)
    Value:
    Opposite: abrunden
    see details >
  • draufhalten
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    point at and "fire"
    (used for cameras as well as guns in an ego shooter for instance)
    Value:
    see details >
  • draufstehen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to be written on it, to say
    (For the context of something being written on something, like the price being written on a label, or the name on the bell. "rauf" and "herauf" wouldn't work because "stehen" is 100% stationary and doesn't make sense with a direction. )
    Value: coming soon
    see details >
  • raufbringen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to bring up(ward)
    (In the literal sense of bringing something or someone up or upstairs.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufdrücken
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to push (onto it)
    (This is the most common verb for pushing actual buttons, if you don't want to specify the button explicitely.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)rauffahren
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to drive up
    (In the literal sense of driving up somewhere. NOT for driving up costs. Could be a mountain that you drive up, for instance. Sometimes also "drauffahren", but then the focus is clearly on being "on" it after. Think the ramp of a ship)
    Value:
    2.
    to boot, to increase
    (For computers and output of production lines, but "hochfahren" is WAY more common there. The spoken past is built with "haben".)
    Value:
    3.
    to crash into
    ("drauffahren" - Specifically, someone driving their car into the one in front of them. Usually used with the person as "object" and in Dative. "Er ist mir draufgefahren.")
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)rauffallen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to fall on top of something
    (Rarely used. Sometimes (even rarer) you can find "rauffallen", which means the same.)
    Value:
    2.
    to fall upwards
    (Theoretically, the word could mean that. Maybe in the stupid MeTaVeRsE one day. )
    Value:
    Opposite: (he)runterfallen
    see details >
  • (d)raufgehen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    go up(ward), go upstairs, to rise
    ("raufgehen" (no dr) - depending on region "hochgehen" can be more idiomatic for stairs. In the sense of rising, "raufgehen" sounds fairly colloquial and a bit more negative than steigen.)
    Value:
    Opposite: runtergehen
    2.
    to die
    ("draufgehen" - colloquial term, usually used in the context of almost dying during a risky incident.)
    Value:
    3.
    to be spent on
    ("draufgehen für" - primarily for time and money and usually in contexts where you want to express that something is costly, and not in a good way.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)raufhaben
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to be good at something
    (ONLY "draufhaben" - Colloquial, usually the skill is phrased as a zu-sentence.)
    Value:
    2.
    to have on top, as topping
    (Pretty much only in sense of food. Think of having onions on a pizza. Can be both "raufhaben" and "draufhaben". "raufhaben" is more about the moment of putting it on. Mostly used in combo with the modal verbs "wollen" or "können".)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufheben
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to lift something on top of something
    (Literally, think of a box onto a table. Includes a notion of placing it up there, so not just lifting.)
    Value:
    Opposite: runterheben
    see details >
  • raufholen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to get someone up
    (Think of a singer getting a fan up on stage or a diver bringing up something from a sunken wreck.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufkommen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to come up(stairs)
    (Mainly used in context of apartment buildings or other scenes where one person is "up" and the other "down" in terms of location. "hochkommen" is also idiomatic for that.)
    Value:
    2.
    to come/go on top of something
    (Mainly used for toppings or figuratively for fees. NOT for going on top of a location.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)rauflassen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to let someone up somewhere
    (Mostly in a literal sense, like letting someone on stage, for example. )
    Value:
    Opposite: (d)runterlassen
    2.
    to leave sth. on sth.
    (Think of leaving hot peppers on a pizza, not taking them off. ONLY works with "drauf-" because it is stationary, not directed.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)rauflegen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to put something on top of that/it
    (You'd use it if the destination is already somehow specified. "rauflegen" is more idiomatic, but "drauf-" also works. "her-" does NOT, despite what textbooks might imply.)
    Value:
    Opposite: runternehmen
    2.
    to add on top, to put on top of
    (In the context of adding an extra sum or compensation on top of a base - "drauflegen" is the more idiomatic choice. Usually in combination with "müssen".)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufmachen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to put something on top of something else
    (That's what you do with extra cheese on a pizza. So it's really really important. Well, for me, at least.)
    Value:
    Opposite: runtermachen
    see details >
  • raufnehmen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to take upward or to take on
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufschreiben
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to write something on something
    (Think of stuff like writing a date on a box in the fridge. It's more suited for short notes than writing a whole text on a piece of paper. )
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufsehen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to look on top of something, to look upward
    (Technically, it can mean that, and in some regions people might use it, but the better choices are "raufgucken" or "raufschauen". DON'T use this one.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • (d)raufsetzen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to sit down on (it)
    ("(sich+Acc) raufsetzen (auf)" - Literally, for sitting down on something. Think of someone asking if they can sit down on the table. MUST have a direct object, so it's often used reflexively.)
    Value:
    2.
    to put on top
    ("einen draufsetzen" - pretty much a fixed phrase in contexts where someone "one ups" a situation.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufspringen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to jump on top of it
    (In the literal sense of jumping on a table for example. Also used as "draufspringen". The meaning is the same but "rauf" sounds more like a directional motion while "drauf" sounds like the end result.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufstellen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to put something onto somewhere
    Value:
    Opposite: runterwerfen
    2.
    to turn up
    (In the sense of "to higher intensity". Pretty rare, but you might hear it in context of heating.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • rauftragen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to carry up(stairs)
    ("hochtragen" is more common, overall.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufwerfen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to throw up, to throw on
    (In the literal sense of throwing something up somewhere. Think of a dad throwing a candy bar up the his kids in the tree house. "hochwerfen" is more common in my opinion. Can also be herauf (motion) and "drauf" (end location).)
    Value:
    see details >
  • raufziehen
    ((he)rauf verb)
    1.
    to pull up
    (In the sense of literally pulling something up somewhere.)
    Value:
    see details >


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