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Dictionary > ein verbs

    Here's a quick overview with translations. For family, examples and more check the details.
  • einarbeiten
    (ein verb)
    1.
    introduce someone to a new job
    Value:
    2.
    to work in something
    (An idea into a story for instance)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einatmen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to breath in, to inhale
    Value:
    Opposite: ausatmen
    see details >
  • einbauen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to build in
    Value:
    Opposite: ausbauen
    see details >
  • einberufen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to convoke, to call
    (A very formal term for calling people together for a council session. NOT for daily life at all.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einbezahlen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to deposit, to pay in
    (In the sense of depositing money and usually in contexts of "adding" regularly to an account. Like a savings account for instance. Not for simply depositing some money once. Rare overall.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einbeziehen (in)
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to include
    (A formal term, pretty much only used in context of including information or someone's opinions into a decision process.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einbilden
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to imagine
    ("sich+Dat etwas einbilden" - has a negative tone, often in context of someone being delusional about themselves. Always used reflexively.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einbinden
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to include, to involve
    (Pretty much only in the context of actively involving someone in a project. Think of a consulting agency that is involved in some sort of decision making process.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einblenden
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to show, to overlay
    (Only in the sense of displaying video content, like an overlay for instance. Think of a sales channel where they overlay the phone number over the screen.)
    Value:
    Opposite: ausblenden
    see details >
  • einbrechen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to break in
    (Breaking in to houses, but also breaking in on a frozen lake)
    Value:
    2.
    to collaps, to nosedive
    (For prices and other measures, that suddenly fall off a cliff)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einbringen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to yield
    (usually in the sense of either earnings or trouble or problems. "etwas bringt jemandem (Dative) etwas/nichts ein.")
    Value:
    2.
    to get involved
    ("sich+Acc einbringen" - in the sense of actively participating and showing engagement)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einbüßen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to lose
    (Often used in contexts of losing quality or another gradual loss.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einchecken
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to check in
    Value:
    see details >
  • eindämmen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to curb, to contain, to dam
    (The core idea is that you prevent something from spreading or expanding. Often used in context of threats, like diseases or financial bubbles bursting... to name two example from our times :))
    Value:
    see details >
  • eindringen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to enter (against some resistance), to penetrate
    (Works for a wide range of contexts and it's not always negative.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • eindrücken
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to indent (by pressing)
    (Not very common. Think of making a dent into a nice, soft avocado.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einengen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to constrain, to constrict, to stint, to narrow down
    (Works for narrowing the number of choices, but also for constraining a person’s self expression.)
    Value: coming soon
    see details >
  • einfahren
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to retract
    (For a mechanically extended thing like a sun blind for example.)
    Value:
    Opposite: ausfahren
    2.
    to rake in, to bring in
    (Was first used for the harvest in fall, but got broadened to include money and also for fame or complements. And for the harvest in fall. That's also where the other uses are coming from.)
    Value:
    3.
    to enter
    (For driving into a venue, like a stadium for example. Very rare. Spoken past is built with "sein")
    Value:
    see details >
  • einfallen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to come to ones mind, to remember
    (some thought or idea ‘falls’ into someones mind, )
    Value:
    Opposite: entfallen
    2.
    to collapse
    ( in sense of a building or a roof)
    Value:
    3.
    to invade
    (in context of armies and countries)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einfangen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to capture
    (With a focus in keeping. Works for catching animals but also for catching the mood of a landscape in a picture.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einfassen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to edge, to border with, to frame
    (The core theme is putting some sort of frame or surrounding on something, like a plot of flowers that is surrounded by a fence for instance. )
    Value:
    see details >
  • einfließen (in)
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to be included in
    (Pretty much only used for ideas and thoughts.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einflößen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to "feed" a drink
    (Slowly, carefully feeding someone a drink. The other sense is much more common.)
    Value:
    2.
    to instill
    (Same idea as before, but in a figurative sense. Fairly common with basic emotions like fear, disgust, hatred, courage and awe. Not always idiomatic though, so you need to know what works and what doesn't.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einfrieren
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to freeze something
    (put in a freezer. Spoken past with "haben")
    Value:
    Opposite: auftauen
    2.
    to freeze (in)
    (Get into a frozen state. More common than "gefrieren". NOT used in sense of halting, but it does work for freezing computers.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einfügen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to insert, to inject
    (The best translation depends on the context. The core theme is putting something into an existing "whole". Like adding a chapter to the middle of a book. Also used reflexively for the idea of integrating oneself somewhere - "sich+Acc einfügen".)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einführen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to introduce
    (For new rules or customs. Also works for products, sometimes.)
    Value:
    2.
    to import
    (Economic jargon.)
    Value:
    Opposite: ausführen
    3.
    to insert
    (Slowly inserting objects somewhere. Not very common. NOT for inserting a card. )
    Value:
    see details >
  • eingeben
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to enter
    (In the sense of using a keyboard. NOT for entering buildings and also NOT for filling out a form by hand.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • eingehen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to die, to wither
    (For plants! Sometimes used figuratively for people's spirits.)
    Value:
    2.
    to shrink
    (What clothes do when you wash them too hot. Work in some figurative contexts, but generally "schrumpfen" is the more broad term.)
    Value:
    3.
    to enter
    (For contracts, bets and risk - they're all the direct object. or for accepting offers, then it's "eingehen auf+Acc".)
    Value:
    4.
    to talk about sth /to address sth, to react to
    ("eingehen auf+Acc" - it's best to think of it as the opposite of "to ignore". Can be used for a particular piece of information at a lecture as well as a person in a relationship.)
    Value:
    5.
    to enter, to be included
    ("eingehen in" - only in a few contexts, particularly a "piece of information" becoming part of a larger narrative.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • eingerüsten
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to surround with a scaffold
    (Think of a construction workers putting a scaffold around a building.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • eingestehen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to admit, to concede
    ("jemandem+Dat etwas+Acc eingestehen" - There is a sense that you have been denying it prior. Actually more common in the context of admitting something to yourself. Then, it's "sich+Dat etwas eingestehen". )
    Value:
    see details >
  • eingewöhnen (sich+Accusative)
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to settle in/to acclimatize
    ("sich (Akk) eingewöhnen"... mostly for new environments, but not very commonly used)
    Value:
    see details >
  • eingießen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to pour in liquid
    (equally as common as "einschenken")
    Value:
    Opposite: ausgießen
    see details >
  • eingreifen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to intervene, to step in
    (Literally, "to grab in". Works for small interventions up to armies. )
    Value:
    see details >
  • eingrenzen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to limit, to narrow down
    (Primarily used in context of narrowing down a field of information. For limiting someone in some way, "einschränken" is the better choice most of the time.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einhalten
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to keep, to respect
    (Mainly for deadlines and other limits, but also more generaly for rules, though "sich an Regeln halten" is more idiomatic.)
    Value:
    2.
    to keep it in
    (In the context of not going to pee. NOT common and some people might not even understand it.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einhandeln
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to get, to earn
    ("sich+Dat etwas einhandeln" - ONLY in a context of getting something bad and unexpected as a consequence for your actions)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einhängen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to mount, to hook in
    (For a door or a window that you hang into the hinges. )
    Value:
    Opposite: aushängen
    see details >
  • einheimsen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to rake in, to cop, to bring home
    (Fairly common, cute sounding word for contexts where someone "snatches" a price of some kind. Think of a squirrel finding a stash of acorns. )
    Value:
    see details >
  • einholen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    catch up and be equal
    (In a sort of race. It NEEDS a direct object (whatever it is that you're catching up to))
    Value:
    2.
    to get groceries
    (Slightly old school and regional. Does NOT take a direct object.)
    Value:
    3.
    to take down
    (for flags and sails)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einkacken
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to poop your pants
    (Often used reflexively "sich+Dative" but it doesn't have to be.)
    Value:
    2.
    to be scared
    ("sich+Dative einkacken" - quite common colloquial phrase.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einkaufen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to do grocery shopping
    (Often used in phrasings "einkaufen gehen/sein")
    Value:
    see details >
  • einkehren
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to stop at, to stay at
    (Rather old school, pompous word for stopping at a restaurant or inn, either just for food or to stay the night. Implies that you've been on the road quite a bit before.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einklappen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to fold in
    (For solid things with a hinge AND virtual menus, like a drop down in an app. NOT for paper.)
    Value:
    Opposite: ausklappen
    see details >
  • einklemmen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to get stuck
    (Needs to be a "pinching" sort of stuck with force from two sides. NOT for getting stuck in traffic or a car getting stuck in snow. That would be "hängen bleiben" or "stecken bleiben".Often used reflexively if part of your body gets stuck somewhere.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einknicken
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to fold, to cave in
    (Can theoretically be used literally, but the main use is for humans "folding under pressure". Think a politician giving in to demands of the coalition.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einkochen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to preserve, to boil down
    (When you boil fruits or veggies to conserve them. The "ein" expresses the reduction in "size" and also the "putting in a jar". NOT for figuratively "boiling down" something.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einkriegen (sich)
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to get yourself back in, to relax
    ("sich+Acc einkriegen", think of it as the counter move to freaking out.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einladen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to load in
    ((loading something into something, like for instance into a trunk))
    Value:
    Opposite: ausladen
    2.
    to invite
    (You "load something in" to your party.)
    Value:
    Opposite: ausladen
    see details >
  • einlagern
    (ein verb)
    1.
    to store, to stock
    (A technical term for storing something for a long time. Think movie costumes after filming has finished. Also quite common in the context of the body storing something, like fat or lead.)
    Value:
    see details >
  • einlassen
    (ein verb)
    1.
    let enter
    (Sounds VERY formal and only used in contexts like opera and so on. Has a notion of welcoming, rather than giving permission. The noun is more common.)
    Value:
    2.
    to get involved with, to engage, to say yes to
    ("sich+Acc einlassen auf+Acc" - in the context of deals or offers of some kind, where you are a bit skeptical. Also used for engaging with people in the sense of a relationship - business or private.)
    Value:
    3.
    to fill, to let in
    (ONLY for bathwater or water in the sink. The water/bath is the direct object, usually, but it can also be the bathtub.)
    Value:
    Opposite: ablassen
    4.
    to set in, to embed
    (In the sense of arts and crafts. Think of a gold smith slowly putting a stone into a socket. ONLY for such contexts, not to be used generally.)
    Value:
    see details >


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