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SirElfmo
SirElfmo
5 days ago

Do you have a recommended source for looking at etymology of German words? In English I would use “etymonline.com”, is there a similar source in German?

SirElfmo
SirElfmo
6 days ago

Have you heard of “The Thinking Method” aka “Language Transfer”?

It’s just one guy (like you) that does audio courses for language learning, he’s done different languages including a beginner one in German.

The audio quality isn’t excellent but the content is really good for beginner level.

SirElfmo
SirElfmo
5 days ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Yes, it’s easy to follow, he covers some good grammar without too much jargon and he focuses on remembering how to get to what you want to say, not just memorising rules.

He also encourages thinking about the meaning of words, and has some neat tricks for getting started.

here’s a link: https://www.languagetransfer.org/german

lisa
lisa
1 month ago

Hello Emanuel,
My hubby, Mark, and I are coming to Berlin for a week in November and want to take German classes in the mornings while we are there. We have considered ALPADIA, Inlingua, Victoria, Language International, Humbolt… Ak, so many! Do you happen to know anything about any of these? Any recommendations (or ones to avoid)? We have been taking private lessons in German for a while and I follow your blog site, but we are still at an A1-A2 level.

Thank you for any advice you can offer. (Lisa)

lisa
lisa
1 month ago
Reply to  Emanuel

OK. Thanks for trying!
Lisa

lisa
lisa
1 month ago
Reply to  lisa

Hi Emanuel,
I asked my nephew, who has lived in Berlin for a while. He said,

Hey there! I haven’t taken a one-week course, but I’ve taken many evening and intensive courses, for various lengths of time. GLS is generally regarded as the best school and my own experience agrees. I highly recommend it! And they do have one-week courses. I’ve also had good experiences with Goethe Institute, Kapitel Zwei, and Speakeasy, but quick glances at their websites lead me to conclude that none of them offer courses for just one week.”

In case anyone else is interested in this same topic… 

Queene42
Queene42
1 year ago

Emanuel…you had an article on a German website like Duolingo, but you liked it better because you could skip around the topics instead of just having to go step by step. Would you please let me know the name of this site…I want to share it with my kids. Thx so much

Junie Curtiss
Junie Curtiss
1 year ago

Meine Empfehlung: Slow German mit Annik Reubens. She speaks slowly and clearly and her audios all have a free transcript. The topics are so diverse that you wind up learning vocabulary about a huge number interesting themes.

proland
proland
1 year ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Der Podcast das ich am liebsten habe ist “Zeit Verbrechen”. Die Geschichten sind immer interessant und sachlich da gesellt. Die Hauptdarstellerin, Sabina Rükert, sprich ein ausgezeichnetes, klares Deutsch und Ihre Aussprache ist wunderschön. Ich kann es ohne Vorbehalt weiterempfehlen.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Die Sendung mit der Maus is awesome, is a really good watch.

Guillermo
Guillermo
1 year ago

Hi Emanuel! I just became member and unlocked the full power of being able to read your blog completely. Your explanations are super clear and entertaining as well. Super enjoyable!

I’d like to see a list of articles with the most visits, or the most done, or the most comments, or which could somehow be deemed the best or most interesting. It would help me find the best content more quickly, and probably keep me more engaged too.

Also a button that takes me to a random article I haven’t read would I find cool. This is just not to keep track myself and search. The server already knows. :)

Elena
Elena
1 year ago

Hi,

Thank your for this blog, its great!All the links here are very helpful!
I just recently started to learn German and I
m always on the look for more resources. So I thought I can contribute with some more.
I found a great website for learning German: hps://ifu-institut.at/
From here I get grammar exercises, letters etc. all in all many examples and a lot of information!

I hope I could share my findings and help someone out.

Mohammad
Mohammad
2 years ago

I discovered your blog by coincidence when I was searching for some word and I liked the way you explain things. I have a suggestion, why don’t you develop a mobile app? it will spread to more audience since the usage of mobile devices is much more than personal computers. Think about it.

Philip
Philip
2 years ago

Vielen Dank für all die Herstellung und andere Verbindungen. Hoffentlich eines Tages kann ich die meistens besuchen. Für mich heutzutage, finde ich mich auf You Tube, Filme auf Deutsch zu hören und schauen. Deshalb kann ich meine Hörenverständnis verbessern, besonderes bei den verschiedenen Dialekten, die man im vier Länder anhört. Die Grammatik kommt für mich immer später an zu lernen. Lesen steht in zweite Stelle, wovon man auch die Gramatik und neue Wörter lernen kann.

Peter Jansen
Peter Jansen
2 years ago

There are more than 2,300 free German audio-books at

https://librivox.org/

You can use text to speech software to find out what your OWN typed text will sound like. This won’t sound as good as a natural speaker, but the days of Microsoft Sam (Stephen Hawking’s voice) are over. Microsoft Hedda isn’t bad, although I prefer Microsoft Stefan. There are several good free text to speech packages. I like Panopreter Basic, but you may wish to check out other products before making a choice.

https://www.panopreter.com/en/products/panopreter/index.php

Links worked and were safe when I last used them, but are not guaranteed.

Iaroslav Shcherbatyi
Iaroslav Shcherbatyi
2 years ago

Hey. The link to the “Zertifikat Deutsch – Sample Test” is missing; Is it this one: https://www.telc.net/pruefungsteilnehmende/sprachpruefungen/pruefungen/detail/zertifikat-deutsch-telc-deutsch-b1.html#t=2 ?

Sher
Sher
2 years ago

hi there,

A great list! Thanks a lot for putting it together. I am learning German and share my experience and strategies on my blog – https://blog.kwiko.app

Check it out and add to the list of you like it .
-Sher

Rob
Rob
2 years ago

Hi Emanuel, thanks so much for the work you do. This site, your explanations, and even once-in-a-while your jokes ;) are truly amazing. I can’t thank you enough for your insight. Full stop.

I’m sure you’ve addressed this elsewhere but I haven’t been able to find it yet– I am wondering your recommendations or anyone on here’s recommendations for a B1 online course. I would love to supplement your explanations with a structured course. I am really learning a lot from your site, but with the piecemeal approach I feel I’m a bit directionless and not building on what I’m learning. I am struggling with figuring out what exactly I need to know to pass certification exams for each level. There are so many courses and teachers out there, I would love any insight or feedback from you or your readers on courses they have used to efficiently and quickly build their language skills. Any info would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks!

Sergio_dbg
Sergio_dbg
3 months ago
Reply to  Rob

I have the same problem as you. Taking things from here and there that I’m always repeating the same thing and never reaching a good point. I have tried Goethe online self learning course and it’s good but to be honest I feel i need something else and besides I have realized that self learning is not my thing which I though it was!! . If you know about something please let me know!

kristal
kristal
3 years ago

on the Deutsche Welle website, there’s a whole series called “nico’s weg” about a spanish guy moving to germany and learning the language as he goes. and there’s a little quiz and vocab at the end of every lesson :))

kristal
kristal
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

it’s addictive!! i’ve only gotten like halfway through A1, but i think it goes up to B2. and the guy’s kinda cute haha

Sergio_dbg
Sergio_dbg
3 months ago
Reply to  Emanuel

It’s ok but man at the 3rd chapter this guy was already talking with declination and all those things that we know are not that easy to understand. So everybody will think that man German is easy! -_-

Alexandra England
Alexandra England
3 years ago

Tolle Seite. Weiter so! :)

Helen Smith
Helen Smith
3 years ago

Thank you for providing the information. This links are very useful for us. All the websites have amazing features for their learners. We can avail maximum benefits for their learning. They have great teams which are always ready to help. We can upgrade ourselves. We can compare it and can select according to our suitability. There is also one resource which I know, that is https://nativemonks.com/. This helped me a lot to learn new languages.

johnwrou
johnwrou
3 years ago

Hi, My question is knowing when to use ‘in’ + something (like a time or place name) and when to use ‘im’ + something (time or place name). I understand that some place names (e.g. Schweiz) are feminine in which case it might be: ‘in der Schweiz’. I also understand that ‘im’ is essentially ‘in’ + ‘dem’. With month names I seem be finding that it is often ‘im April’ or ‘im September’. This implies that in German one is essentially saying, ‘in the April’ or ‘in the September’ and one just doesn’t say ‘in April’ or ‘in September’ as one say in English, right? But with place names it is a different matter. I seem to be encountering that about 50% of the time it is ‘in + place name (e.g. in Frankreich)’ and other times it is ‘im + place name (such as im Mittleren Osten)’. To make it even more complicated it can be like ‘in der Schweiz’ (because Schweiz is feminine and always comes with a definite article?). Is it because there is an implied definite article before some place names and not for others? Like, is it ‘in the Switzerland’ (which one wouldn’t day in English) but for another country it is ‘in Frankreich’ and one would just not say ‘in the France’ and one just has to learn which place name comes with a definite article or not? In other words, I have been finding it hard to predict when to use ‘in’ or ‘im’ when used in a sentance and a location is being talked about, whether something happening there or something / someone is existing there or whether a person is living there. Hope that question made sense. Thanks.

Günter Heini
4 years ago

Great website with lots of helpful ideas and thoughts how to learn german. Thank you.