Advent Calendar 17 – “How to gain weight fast”

Hallo ihr lieben,

door number 17 of our Advent Calendar, and this time we’re in for … drumroll please…. some serious calories. The traditional German Christmas cake called

der Stollen

Wow, what a name for a pastry. Stollen. Katchung. Sounds uber German. And it’s actually not only the name for a cake, it’s also what mining tunnels are called. How do these two things connect? Well, the origin of Stollen is actually a word we all know really well: stellen (to put).  A Stollen originally had the idea of “thing that stands/makes stand” and before it was used for the mining tunnel itself, Stollen was the word for the rough, wooden posts and lumps that were used in mining.

And that’s what probably inspired people hundreds of years ago to name their cake-bread after it –  because Stollen isn’t an elegant, noble cake. Not at all. It’s a bulky lump. And it’s super heavy, too. Like… the average weight of one pound of Stollen is 2.3 pounds. I know, sounds surreal, right?

Stollen is made from a yeast dough with wheat flour and plenty of fat. And sugar of course. It often contains raisins and it is usually covered by a THICK layer of powder sugar, which will cover your shoulders with a white layer – just like snow.
There are several variations, like with almond, butter, marzipan or puppy.
Hahaha… gotcha. I mean poppy of course.

Is Stollen tasty? Well, yeah usually it is. But as I said before, it’s suuuper heavy so it really stuffs you good. In combination with some Glühwein, which contains WAY more sugar than you’d ever want to know,  you’re pretty much good with calories for the day. But hey, it’s called Girthmas for a reason, right?

Most people eat Stollen only around Christmas but then it is absolutely mandatory. Like…  if you haven’t eaten at least one slice, you failed Christmas.

boromir-on-stollen

 

So… better have some Stollen ready.
Or else!!!
And to make sure you have some, here’s two generations explaining how it’s done. And oh my god, they’re super  lovely. Check them both out :).

So that’s it for today. How about you? Have you had Stollen before? And did you like it? Do you have Stollen in your country? How is it called? Let me know in the comments below and win today’s giveaway.
Viel Spaß mit den Videos und bis morgen.

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for members :)

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Marion Haftel
Marion Haftel

Ich fühle mich inspiriert. Ich muss etwas Stollen machen.

Katrin Knauer
Katrin Knauer

Better to say “ich muss einen Stollen backen (or machen, but backen is better)

parisbongi
parisbongi

Omi ist fantastisch aber gefärlich für meine Gestalt! “Cups” und “teaspoons” und “potato masher” in Deutschland?
Our favorite Stollen in Texas was in fact a “world famous” fruitcake https://www.collinstreet.com/online_bakery/all_deluxe_fruitcakes

Andrew
Andrew

We have Stollen in England. You can buy it everywhere; supermarkets, bakeries and general shops selling packaged xmas gifts. Ich finde Stollen schmeckt nach mehr. If that didn’t make sense I meant Stollen is MOREISH! mmmm….

Katrin Knauer
Katrin Knauer

Ugh. Always hated Stollen!! Don’t much care for fruit cake, either (that’s a slight understatement…)

Paul E Ramoni Jr
Paul E Ramoni Jr

Yes, many times. It’s sort of like a German version of the Italian Panettone. Sounds like Stollen could have the reputation often applied to fruit cake in the US.

Brightstar
Brightstar

Christmas Pudding we call it in Australia. I understand the traditional one is hand made and wrapped, tied and boiled in pudding cloth, this is why it is also called boiled pudding.
It is very rich but I don’t think it is as heavy as Stollen. Many years ago they put small silver/copper coins into the dough. It is prepared well in advance and served with warm custard. Tastes delicious but it takes a lot of effort to burn those calories.
Nowadays, we find all sort of Christmas Puddings but their flavor and consistency varies.

Ruth
Ruth

Aldi (Süd) is in Canberra, too, and other parts of Australia. There’s even one not far from Sydney’s famous Manly Beach. They have Stollen, but it’s been available in Australia long before Aldi found us. Imported ones can be rather old and tired by the time they get here. Panettone, the lighter Italian fruity Christmas bread that tends to come in a fancy cardboard box, is probably more widely available.

Yorkshire folk eat Christmas cake (dense and fruity) with cheese. Preferably Wensleydale – the one made even more famous by Wallace and Gromit. Apparently originally a blue cheese and a blue variant is being produced again.

Omi’s smattering of English is one thing. Her use of baking powder instead of yeast quite another. It surely produces quite a different result and won’t be such fun to make, either.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Henceforth will refer to Stollen as ‘roof support’ – have ours already in stock (Aldi!!) here in west Wales. Love German Is Easy.xx

Ruth
Ruth

Since adding that I’ve been to the local supermarket. Smallish by local standards, but one of a major Australian chain. They have this http://www.dresdnerstollen-shop.eu/lang/en/Dresdner-Christstollen-1kg-metaldose.71.html right next to Pfeffernüsse, which we get quite a lot of,
Locally made Stollen is rarer, but can be found in some places, e.g. Perth, Western Australia, where there is this mouth-watering-looking bakery – http://www.littlehomebakery.com.au/ , with some of the things you seem to have on every second street corner in Berlin. Near the bottom of the page “& Much More” is “Christmas Stollen”.

And many thanks for the whole advent calendar, including the exercises. I’m enjoying it very much, and can barely keep up, so don’t know how you manage to produce it. Very much appreciated..

Charles Gleaves
Charles Gleaves

I made Stollen with Marzipan for several years in the Midwest of the U.S. I love Marzipan and enjoyed my Stollen. I stopped making it about five years ago because I felt like I was unintentionally forcing people to politely taste it. No one had ever heard of it and no one ever found it to be any more interesting to them than a polite obligation. I didn’t want to just make it just for myself.

norfede
norfede

We call it “Pan dulce” here in Paraguay, but it’s much closer to the Italian Panettone than to the Stollen I think.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I know Christmas is over, but can you buy stollen at this place?? https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iNtYHswzFzM

Anonymous
Anonymous

Haha ……..I was being facetious , because of your love for Katzen :-) Leftover, unsold Stollen probably in storage room for next Christmas :-)