Prefix Verb Advent Calendar – 5

advent-5

Today’s surprise will be especially surprising – viel Spaß mit Nummer 5 :)

Today I have no prefix verb

Boooh. But instead… a search function :). Yeay. I mean… you got the article about the crazy uses of eben and gerade so enough reading anyway. The search function is in the bottom left corner of the page. Yes, technically it was there yesterday already and yes, it looks like shit. But it works. Design, shmesign. I’ll worry about that on Monday. Have a great Sonnabend!!

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Angie
Angie
6 years ago

Mr MacFeagel, ps., although you may probably know already, just a tip, if you’re giving a gift to your neighbours, don’t say, This is a gift for you, because I have just found out that Gift actually means Poison here! [I wish I’d known that before I gave my neighbour a bottle of English wine when I arrived back here, mind you, she may have thought it was correctly named when she tasted it !]

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

Mr MacFeagel, please don’t be defeated, bacon is not the be all and end all, really, even I’m prepared to eat the fat until I get my pronunciation up to par, which will probably be a long time yet. Have you thought about buying a meat slicer machine, then you could buy the joint and slice your own bacon, that’s what I’d do if I missed it so much. Merry Christmas to you and Mrs MacFeagel, hope you have a good one :)

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

Hi Emanuel, thank you for your help, I did indeed get the meat I wanted. I wrote down what you’ve said and added the word for ‘without’, “Schinken mit ohne Knochen, und luft gertocknet bitte”, with a big smile..and it worked, eventually, after the butcher stopped laughing, so ich danke Ihnen, Sie ein Stern sind! [I google translated that bit, :)]

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

How do you get on asking for bacon?, I tried yesterday for the first time, “dick Speck”, I thought it didn’t sound right…and I was right because I got a lump of bacon fat…I kid you not, but hey it tasted smashing when I sliced and fried it…can’t imagine how many calories it was though..

MacFeagle
MacFeagle
6 years ago
Reply to  Angie

Yes, Speck is translated as bacon in Leo.org but it also means fat. Pretty confusing but I’m sure it was delicious. Bacon as we know it doesn’t exist I’m afraid, at least not around here. This has been one of the hardest things about moving to Germany.

MacFeagle
MacFeagle
6 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

That’s close but it looks like the American version which is belly pork and is an offense to God and man. The British have this type of bacon which is prepared from the back: comment image?v=1348767035

MacFeagel
MacFeagel
6 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Yes, British bacon does appear to be Kotelett taken off the bone and sliced thinly. When fried or grilled it is the food of the Gods.
Interestingly this cut of pork is called a “chop” in English but when the corresponding cut is taken from a lamb it is called a cutlet. This is part of the confusion of terms that means that when a Brit goes into a German butcher, the chances of reaching an understanding on anything are pretty much zero.

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

Hi Mr MacFeagle, thank you for the advice, I thought maybe I should just print a picture, but I didn’t want to come across as a dumb English person, mind you that’d be better than going in and saying, “mooo cow”, when I want beef! Have a lovely evening.

Angie
Angie
6 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

(>_<)

MacFeagle
MacFeagle
6 years ago

Oops, I meant Angie.

MacFeagle
MacFeagle
6 years ago

Hi Rosie, I’ll leave it to with the proper linguistic qualifications to provide you with a translation but what we have found helpful is to take a picture of the uncooked joint and ask the butcher to provide it. otherwise my wife, who is technically very advanced, cannot convey what it is we’re looking for.

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

I’ve searched German cookery sites, and I think Prager Schinken is the same cut of meat as English gammon cut, but will this be widely available? Ok..now I’ll stop, and await your reply, before I turn this into a cookery site! :).

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

Would ‘Gelenk’ or, ‘Stück’, work if I put it somewhere into the sentence “Rohes Schinken mit Schwarte gepökelt”, ?

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

Just in case you are thinking “what, you live here, and you can’t speak German!”, I have a holiday home, which I bought just 6 months ago, and have only spent 2 weeks in the summer, and am now here for the Christmas period. But this time next year, I will be speaking fluent, because I want to be able to talk to my brilliant neighbours properly.

Angie
Angie
6 years ago

Hi, I’m hoping you won’t mind, but I have a really cheeky question that is not related to anything here…well actually it is a little bit, being as it’s to do with Christmas… so here goes..
I am struggling to buy a joint of cured ham/gammon. I have tried using different mocked-up (by me) phrases for what I think it would be, but I keep getting a raw pork joint. My neighbours are brilliant and try to help me, and told me to ask for “Rohes Schinken mit Schwarte gepökelt”, which I wrote down, took it with me yesterday, and the butcher looked at me in bewilderment, then pointed at a tray of sliced ham. How do I ask for the whole joint? [I have invited my 83 year old Nachbar to a meal next week, and am planning to cook a few English things for her to try, like Yorkshire Puddings, Trifle, Eton Mess, and Spiced Gammon,.. hope I don’t make her ill !!]
Hope you can help.

Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago

that is called a stocking lol, do you call it a boot in Germany?

Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

yeah, those are stockings not little boots. They do look like Uggs tho. I can’t see them as boots, boots are hard, stockings are soft. Maybe because that shape is so symbolic, look up “Christmas stockings” for images, literally all of them look like that. Even the same tilt. kind of crazy to see how consistent they are, people must take their stockings very seriously XD

that being said, I read the Wikipedia page for Christmas stockings and it says some people use actual boots:
“According to Phyllis Siefker, children would place their boots, filled with carrots, straw, or sugar, near the chimney for Odin’s flying horse, Sleipnir, to eat. Odin would reward those children for their kindness by replacing Sleipnir’s food with gifts or candy This practice, she claims, survived in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands after the adoption of Christianity and became associated with Saint Nicholas as a result of the process of Christianization”

also, I’ve tried to put Christmas stockings on before, turns out they don’t double as clothing lol.

Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

haha you were supposed to search “Christmas stockings”
https://www.google.com/search?q=christmas+stockings

Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago

Boot “link” doesn’t work!