Advent Calendar 4 – Let’s Poll

Let’s poll

Hello everyone,

and welcome back to the most epic Advent Calendar ever. And in today’s stocking are … drumroll… some polls.
Hooray!
Because we didn’t have enough of those this year :).
Seriously though, I’ve done a poll-episode in the last two calendars already, and I really enjoyed it, so I wanted to do it again this year. #traditionConfirmed

And this year, my focus is actually on etymology and word relations. I regularly use it in the articles, and I think it’s a really underrated tool. But I actually don’t know how much it is used in the German “Teachosphere”.
So yeah… I’ll ask a few questions about that. And, because 2020 was the year of 2020-ism, I couldn’t help but ask a couple of questions about that, too.

So go out and vote, please! I’m really looking forward to checking the results.
And also, if you have any questions about etymology or if you have some cool resources please share them in a comment :)

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About you

I asked for your age last year but... how old do you FEEL?

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What part of Earth are you currently living on?

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For how long have you been reading this AMAZING website, Yourdailygerman.

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About Etymology

Do they use etymology and word relations in German courses?

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Do you come across etymology and word relations in other learning material like textbooks, videos or online programs (besides this blog).

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Do you actively look into etymology and word relations when you're studying German?

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Do you think etymology and word relations should play a bigger role in teaching languages?

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About 2020

How did 2020 affect your German learning?

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If 2020 was food/drink, what would be be?

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***

Have a lovely day and see you tomorrow :).

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dbayly
dbayly
1 year ago

One word relationship trick I use a fair bit is in dict.cc , where you can use wildcards in a search, for eample

https://www.dict.cc/?s=*fahren

:: Wildcard Search
For instance, if you want to find out which words end in “*ords”, just search for *ords
The following wildcards are supported:
* for any amount of letters (*ords)
? for exactly one letter (?ords

Richard
Richard
1 year ago

I reluctantly clicked “Australia”, but that doesn’t cover New Zealand! “Australia” is ok at a pinch but I prefer “Oceania”.

RomanMG
RomanMG
1 year ago

Persönlich sind die Erklärungen zur Etymologie das, was ich in diesem Blog am meisten genieße! Wenn man die “Geschichte” von einem Wort kennt fühlt man besser wo es passt und, falls es keine direkte Übersetzung in seiner Muttersprache gibt, begreift man viel besser das Konzept. Und nicht nur zum Lernen, es ist auch an sich ein sehr interessantes Thema :) Mir hat auch diese “analytische Perspektive” geholfen eine bessere Einsicht in viele Spanische Begriffe zu haben, die ich für “Bedeutungseinheiten” hielt, wo sich aber rausgestellt hat, dass sie aus lateinischen/griechischen Präfixen und Wurzeln bestehen :O

Kika
Kika
1 year ago

When I chose ‘Lemon’ for 2020, I thought I was minority, so I was quite happy to know people thinking here!

Dawson
Dawson
1 year ago

I can’t really remember for my German classes, and I think I may have over estimates the use of etymology because of confusing class lessons with what I’ve read here…but I will say I am also studying for my GRE (again) and for that vocab I’ve been putting etymology on my flashcards and have found it’s really helped in remembering meanings. It’s like finding out the backstory and evolution of a word. Once you learn that a word is, say, related to a Greek god, or some folk story, it’s pretty hard to forget. Sometimes the story is boring, do not memorable/helpful, but that seems to be rare.

Example: “hermetic” as in “hermetically sealed” actually comes from Hermes the god of science, and it’s used for “hermetically sealed” because doing that required an involved “scientific” process :)

Desdra
Desdra
1 year ago

I love finding the roots of words. I found an amazing podcast The History of the English Language Podcast (must include the word podcast). He starts out with the Anglo Saxon invasion and traces English word evolution from all the invading languages. It’s a wonderful place to find the relationship between English and German words.

Knowing an Old English root word can be really helpful in trying to get the meaning of a modern German word. English and German went their separate ways quite a while ago but there is still a close kinship.

Please do keep doing etymology. It gives something to help remember the meaning and use. I always think the more context the better.

coleussanctus
coleussanctus
1 year ago

For etymonline, is there a separate German version or do you just plug German words into it? I never thought to try that before.

Sorry this is out of place. I tried to hit the reply button but for some reason it just shows or hides the reply. It’s not bringing up the comment box like normal.

Mary
Mary
1 year ago

How did 2020 affect your German learning?
My German got better, as it does with time, without me making any intentional effort. I am surrounded by it non-stop though…

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

As a dutch speaker from Belgium, Germans are my direct neighbours. There is a definite kinship between geran an dutch and I can understand german but if most words have the same meaning in G and D I find it very funny when they don’t and mean something compleyely different. Thats where etymology comes in and it is very cultural and refined to know how words were formed and why…

digitalhermit
digitalhermit
1 year ago

Thank you for this wonderful site. Regarding the etymology questions, I definitely would like to see the background of German words. In the past your explanations of the background really do help my understanding. I also find the literal translations of German phrases useful. E.g., something as simple as “Es tut mir leid” gave me difficulties at first because it was introduced as a phrase and it was difficult to match up with the English translation. That is, I was expecting something like “ich bin…” oder “mir geht es …”.

Victoria Martinez
Victoria Martinez
1 year ago

I find etymology to be a very helpful learning tool. Making the connection with the word origen helps me remember it. Besides I am fascinated by language and etymology is part of that fascination. When I google a word (I hardly ever use paper dictionaries any more) I always look for its etymology.

I find your discussions on etymology fascinating. I like to compare grammars also. I find it very interesting and puzzling, for example, that many verbs that are reflexive in German are also reflexive in Spanish, my native tongue, but not in English. I would love to understand why that is so.

Camille713
Camille713
1 year ago

Etymology rocks!!!!

D. Kin
D. Kin
1 year ago

Ich schreibe nie auf Deutsch, weil ich denke, dass ich habe niemand mit dem unterrichten. Dies ist die erste Mal! Ich bin sehr glücklich! Die automatische Handytastatur hilft viel. Ich liebe die commentare in hier zu lessen und (vielmehr) verstanden. Es gibt Menschen von der ganzen Welt. Ich denke, dass wir alle wirklich Brüder werden! (“wo dein sanfter Flügel weit…”) Fröhe Weihnacht aus Mexiko!

Ahmad Mazaheri
Ahmad Mazaheri
1 year ago

Hallo Emmanuel ,
Ich bin einverstanden mit dir dass die Etymologie der Wörtern ist helfreich die neuen Vokabeln oder Ausdrücke einer Sprache zu lernen ( Fremde- oder heimlichesprache ) zu lernen. Das ist warum , Folge ich deine Site seit zehn Jahre sogar in meine 70 er Jahre . Schade das habe ich es nicht in meiner Kindheit gelernt !
Es ist ein relevantes Mittel den Sinn jeglichen Wörtern aus seiner Teilchen und Zeitlich durch der Geschichte mehr genauer verstanden .
Schönen Tag und weiter so

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

I was able to vote for Australia. I guess it pays to read my emails later.

Julie Little
Julie Little
1 year ago

Actually I think the proper drink to describe 2020 is a colonoscopy prep

cjhayesphd1
cjhayesphd1
1 year ago
Reply to  Julie Little

Genau! Deshalb habe ich Plaumen gewählt. Es war das Nächste!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

What Roger H said. I also voted Asia even though I live in Australia.

Kayla-P
Kayla-P
1 year ago
Reply to  Emanuel

I’m awake over here! But I totally understand if you leave us out. We deserve it and it would be totally on-brand for 2020.

Dance with Shadows
Dance with Shadows
1 year ago

Hi Emanuel, why does in See stechen mean to set sail? It is not clear to me how Stechen is connected to that phrase. See. Your teaching method does invite one to wonder about the origin of words. Regards Michael

Amerikanerin
Amerikanerin
1 year ago

In Schweden essen die Schweden „Kvarg“. Ich vermute Kvarg und Quark sind die gleichen Sachen.

Meiner Meinung nach, sind beide kalte, weiße, flüssige Milchprodukte und ich würde mich lieber mit einer Nachtischgabel in den linken Oberschenkel stechen, als ein Milchprodukt essen, das kein Käse ist.

Deshalb kann ich nicht mit Sicherheit sagen, ob Kvarg und Quark sind die gleiche Sachen. Aber, ist mir egal.

Amerikanerin
Amerikanerin
1 year ago
Reply to  Amerikanerin

Sorry – on the train and not really paying attention to where I‘m replying.

Amerikanerin
Amerikanerin
1 year ago
Reply to  Amerikanerin

Actually, the Empfang is mies and when the page reloaded, it reloaded to today‘s date instead of the page I was reading BEFORE disaster struck.

Amerikanerin
Amerikanerin
1 year ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Die Grenze geht bei Brie. Cottage cheese, hmmm… warum? Es gibt so viele andre leckere Käse. Ricotta und Mascarpone esse ich nicht! Mein Vater ist Italiener und die lieben ihre Ricotta und Mascarpone – verstehe ich nicht – beides hat kein Geschmack! (beides: Mascarpone und Ricotta oder beide: zwei Käsesorten?) Er sagt, dass ich keine echte Italienerin bin – wenn man Mascarpone essen muss, um Italienarin zu sein, lehne ich höflich ab, danke.

Amerikanerin
Amerikanerin
1 year ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Genau, aber dann ist der Käse WARM, und schmeckt – weiße, kalte Milchprodukte schmecken nichts außer kalt und weiß. blecch.

Iris Robin
Iris Robin
1 year ago

2020 food/drink. What happened to Wein? Tequila?

Paul Ed
Paul Ed
1 year ago

Oh, and my membership was due for renewal next week, and now I find you’re a flat earther! Australia does exist!!!

What part of Earth are you currently living on?

  • North America
  • Africa
  • Asia
  • Europe
  • My essence lives everywhere (because I am an Indigo Child)
  • South America
Jassey
Jassey
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul Ed

That question really struck a chord with us Aussies! I went with Asia too.

Jassey
Jassey
1 year ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Haha, no worries, she’ll be ‘right mate:)