1.
to yield, to result in, to make
(Mainly used on context of equations, but you might see it more figuratively, too, especially for "making sense".)
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2.
to surrender
("sich+Acc (jemandem) ergeben" - you "yield" yourself, in a way.)
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3.
to present itself
("sich ergeben", the translations vary but the idea is a coincidence/chance/situation "yielding/offering" itself.)
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The German Prefix "er-" explained

The prefix "er-" seems to be very confusing, but there's actually a common underlying theme. Today, we'll find out what that is and check out examples.


The Prefix er- Explained - Part 2

Vocab:

der Urlaub, der Urknall, der Urmensch, erlauben, erfinden, erhalten...


Word Family

Root: *ghabh-

The core idea of this root was:

grabbing, taking

The meaning of geben and to give comes from the idea of grabbing something to hand it to someone, but the family is more diverse than that.
It’s also the origin of the families of habit and hibit, which both come from the Latin verb habere, which meant to hold. That’s also where able is from, which evolved from the word habilitate.

And also part of the family are due, duty and debt. They all go back to a Latin verb debere, which was about the idea of having to give someone something, and which is nothing other than a combination of de- with … habere again.
Here’s a list of the most important English relatives:

  • debt (having to give)
  • duty (having to give)
  • due (having to give)
  • able (capable of “holding”)
  • habit (something you “hold”)
  • inhabit (holding a place and living there)
  • inhibit (holding in)
  • exhibit (holding outward)
  • prohibit (holding/taking away)
  • to give
  • gift
  • forgive (give away)
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