Word of the Day – “lassen”

lassen-meaning-germanHello everyone,

and welcome to our German Word of the Day. This time we’ll, finally… at long last :),  have a look at the meaning of

lassen

 

Lassen is very important verb and it is just as confusing for many learners. Sometimes it’s to let, sometimes it’s to leave sometimes and sometimes is used for some kind of passive or something. Oh and then there are the prefix versions of lassen, for example the infamous verlassen which means to leave – except when YOU are trying to  use it in a sentence. Then it’s usually wrong.
So… we have lots to talk about. We’ll start with lassen and we’ll see that all the meanings actually boil down to one very simple idea. Then we’ll look at two peculiar uses of lassen and talk about the most important prefix versions  and at the end of all that we’ll have a masters degree in Lassenology…. and maybe a slight headache :).
So… are you ready to dive in and find out just what is up with lassen? Then let’s goooo.

Lassen is the German brother of English to let. They both come from the super-mega-hyper-I can’t believe how ancient it actually is Indo-European root *lē(i)-.  The original meaning was something like to let go, to slacken but maybe an image can capture it better…  think of letting the air out of a balloon. Pffffffffrrrrrrrrrrt… and you’re left with a flabby piece of rubber.
This root can be found  in many languages. In English for example, we have late and last  which are based on the idea of weak or slow travelling… low energy travelling if you will.  Lax and lazy mean that we don’t  invest much energy in it and  relaxing is all about removing tension  from a system. And tension is just a form of energy.
The core of all these is  little or no energy…. and that is all we need to explain  lassen. That’s a great claim actually :)

Lassen – because it literally takes no energy to explain it

Now,  lassen is a verb and “no energy” is not really an activity, so let’s modify the core a bit and say:

 to  not invest energy into something. 

All the meanings are based on that. And we’ll get from one meaning to the next just by making one little tiny shift in perspective… so let’s take the tour…

lassen – the tour

The simplest use or interpretation of investing no energy into something  is to not do something. So lassen is something of an opposite to machen.

By the way… a variation of the last one is

The es makes it sound less determined and harsh. You’d use the first if you kid was messing with your phone for example and the second if you’re friend, who recently broke up, ponders calling the ex again and you think it’s a waste of time (and energy).
There’s even a third variation which is super common in spoken German…

This is the weakest of the three and I think the closet match is actually a very casual

  • No, thanks.  or just No.

You wouldn’t use it with a waiter who asks you if you’d like anything else… that would come across a bit arrogant. But you could definitely use it with a friend who suggest something that you don’t want to do.

All right.
On to the next aspect. I said earlier that it would be just a tiny step so here it is … not doing something also means that we’re not  changing the something. We’re not changing the status quo…. or in other words: we’re  leaving things as they are.

The last two examples might raise a question. We have random verbs in their dictionary form (infinitive)….stehen and rumliegen… and there’s neither  zu nor um zu. That is rare and the question we could ask is: is lassen a modal verb? My informed, highly competent answer to that is …. “Kind of, I guess.”.
Okay seriously, the answer is no, but it’s only “no”  because of how modal verbs are defined in German and we don’t have to worry about that. I just wanted to bring that up because this lassen behaves just like it’s English brother to let does. And that brings us to the next aspect of lassen…  which is again just a very tiny step away.
In a way, we can see not changing something  as not doing something against something. And that is pretty much the same as  to allow for something to be or to happen or simply  to let. Tadah. Here we have it. To let has lost most of the aspects of lassen and has focused almost completely on the permission idea.

These were pretty straight forward but there are some more abstract or odd uses, too.

Now, the last example could also be seen as an aspect of it’s own. … a doing nothing as in not taking it away. And there are several such phrasings.

All right.
Quick recap of what lassen can mean:  we had plain not doing something, then leaving something  ( not taking away or  not changing ) and we had to let ( not doing something against it). And I hope you could see just how close they all really are.
But there’s yet another perspective. Location: random kitchen in a shared flat. Time: dinner party, the next morning:

“John…. feel free to help with the dishes.” 
“‘preciate,dude!” (heads for X-box)
“Hey uhm… that’s actually not how I meant it.”

This wasn’t about freedom of choice. This was a demand in disguise. Many phrasings that talk about permission or opportunity can be used that way (may, could)  and so it’s no surprise that lassen can do it, too.

Based on what we’ve learned so far this sentence means

  • The boss lets his secretary come in on weekends.

But most people would understand the sentence as follows

  • The boss makes/has his secretary come in on weekends.

The reason why people understand it that way is … context. It’s just more likely that he has the secretary come than the secretary being so keen on working the weekends.
Here’s another example:

Again, this can be either and what people understand depends on stereotypes and all that. More examples:

So… lassen can turn from letting someone do something to have someone do something without any change to the structure.
Now, we’ll look a little closer it this  demand-lassen in a second but first let’s finish our tour real quick. There is one last meaning, one last aspect and that is… invitation.

Technically, this is an appeal for permission. Or if we see permission as a demand then it is an appeal for activity. But people used even if there wasn’t really any need to ask for something and so a request to not invest energy against something became a request to invest energy for something… just like a double minus is plus

Oh, and do you remember that lassen could be used as kind of an opposite to machen? Well… what would you say would be the translation of

  • Let’s not do it /leave it.

Exactly… a double lassen.

We really do say that :).
All right.
So this was our little tour around lassen and I hope you could see that we didn’t have to move very much to get from one to the other. From doing nothing to not changing (to leave)  to not taking away (to leave)  to permitting (let) to demanding  to inviting… quite impressive. And a very convincing argument in a  “You can’t do nothing all day”-discussion :).
But even though doing nothing is so cool, we won’t do it and instead talk about two phrasings that are a bit peculiar.

lassen – two weird phrasings

Both phrasings fit in perfectly with what we’ve just learned and we could have just used them as examples. But they’re also a bit special which is why we’ll look a little closer.
The most prominent example for the first phrasing is probably this:

This lassen is kind of a mix between the demand-lassen and the permission-lassen. Kind of like this:

I doubt that dad is so eager on doing the homework that he really ask for permission. And it’s as unlikely that the kid just said “Dad, do my homework or no HBO for you.”. The kid made him do it in a gentle manner… by asking him. Well actually probably by nagging him but anyway…. this lassen is a somewhat soft form of having someone do something and it is used a lot in context of services that we pay for.
Now, what makes this lassen  a bit special is the grammar. In the example with the homework we had two direct objects…. one for the letting (dad) and one for the doing (homework). And in German they come right after one another.

  • Das Kind lässt Papa die Hausaufgaben machen.

Now, what’s special about lassen is that we can just skip one of the direct objects… or even both.

We have to use different phrasings in English but in German it’s always the same. Of course, that lässt Raum for confusion. … I mean “leaves room”.

This can be two things

  • Ich lasse das Kind [          ] malen.
  • I let the kid paint [something].
  • Ich lasse [           ] das Kind malen.
  • I let [someone] paint the kid.

and the only way to tell which one it is apart from context is an emphasis…. on  malen in the first version on Kind in the second.
But anyway… so lassen is often used in sense of getting a service of some kind. And I think it sounds a tiny bit less demanding than the “have someone do” phrasing.

All right.
Now let’s get to the second structure, a structure which in German course jargon is sometimes called “Passiversatzform für Passiv mit Modalverb ‘können'” which roughly translates to  “term that no German has ever heard of… seriously”.
Here’s an example

This is the allow-meaning of lassen and the literal translation is this:

  • The door doesn’t allow for itself to be opened.

And because a door is of course not sentient this is just the same as

  • The door can’t be opened.

Here, we can see why it’s called Passiversatzform…. because it is just another way to say

Just for the record though… Passiversatzform is just a name and is only used for students of German. I bet you that none of your friends will know what that is. It is NOT a some super special grammatical feature that only German has. Other languages have similar phrasings. They just didn’t think they needed a special name. So don’t let the name intimidate you. After all it’s just a handy structure that happens to express the same as a passive… at times. The edges are super blurry…

I mean… where does can’t be done end and lets you do start? All these sentence are the exact same phrasing but would they all be called Passelaffufforms? No. And that’s why I don’t really like the name.
This sich lassen phrasing is really  just the plain straight-forward allow-meaning of lassen combined with a verb that has a self reference… and only that when used with a thing, like for example a door, the whole notion of permission makes no sense and it’s about possibility instead. If we need really need to have a -form then I’d much rather have  a Passmeabeerform. I’d certainly use that in after class. But anyways… here’s the basic structure

  • Etwas lässt sich verben.
  • Someone allows for itself to be verbed. (lit)
  • Something can be verbed.

It is used both in written and in spoken German and there are a few quite common examples…

I probably forgot some so if you have another cool one, please share it :).
All right.
Now that we have a pretty good grasp of lassen and we’re ready to face… the swarm. Dun dunn dunnn.
I can already see it in the distance. A dark menacing cloud. Prefixes. Many, many prefixes. But…. the cloud’s not here yet so… uhm…  I guess we’ll have to wait for part 2 :).
So.. hopefully  lassen is a little more clear now. It all more or less boils down to doing nothing.And that’s true for the relatives in other languages too, by the way. The German lassen is just comparetervele… more broaderer.
If you have any questions about lassen so far or if you want to try out some examples just leave  me a comment.
I hope you liked it and see you next time.

for members :)

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Lisa
Lisa

Maria loves Thomas because he gives her her space.

jag041
jag041

Vielleicht ist eine bessere englische Übersetzung für “Die Kritiken lassen auf einen guten Film hoffen” “The reviews allow hope for a good film”, mindestens statt des “literal” Beispiel. Das macht mehr Sinn auf Englisch, und auch gibt es kein “us” mehr.
noch eine Frage
Gibt es noch eine Art, “to drop” auf Deutsch zu sagen, außer “lass etwas fallen”? (Ich hoffe dieser Satz macht Sinn :/ )
und endlich, ja, man kann “leave your shoes on”, aber es geht öfter “leave something on” statt “leave on something”

jag041
jag041

oh tut mir leid!
Noch NOCH eine Frage
Ich hatte einmal eine Freundin gefragt, ob ihr Freund mich anrufen könnte.
Ich versucht zu sagen, “have your boyfriend call me” und sie hatte mich nicht verständen. Meine Worte waren “lass deinen Freund mich anrufen”
würde es in diesem Fall “lass deinen Freund mich anrufen” oder “lass mich deinen Freund anrufen”, weil das sehr sehr verwirrend ist…

jag041
jag041

verstanden ohne umlaut…

Andy
Andy

You could say “Can I leave on my shoes?”, it’s not really wrong, but I think it would be more common to say “Can I leave my shoes on?”

Andy
Andy

What good timing on this post. These Outfittery commercials have been driving me crazy. I really don’t understand their slogan “Echte Männer lassen shoppen” …well and also this guy on the commercial is a bit annoying, but that’s besides the point.

My initial thought on the translation was the literal “Real men leave shopping”, but I didn’t think this made sense. Mainly because in English you would need something to complete it…leave shopping to whom, to what,? Not to mention, I wouldn’t think they would make such a statement that shopping is not for “real men”, which I would take to be a bit sexist. Or I could just be misinterpreting the entire message :)

Anyways, maybe you could shed some light on this.

Thanks!

berlingrabers

Noch ein Beispiel: “Lass es dir/Ihnen/euch schmecken!”

Love God
Love God

Hello everyone,

and welcome to our German Word of the Day.

Man kann diesen Satz nicht so stehen lassen. Richtig ist: Hello everyone, Welcome to our German Word of the Day.

Ich lasse mir die Fälle erklären.
I have someone explain the cases to me.

richtig: I will have someone explain the cases to me.

Ich lasse mir die Rechnung bringen.
I have the waiter bring the bill.

richtig: I am going to ask for the bill.

Ich lasse mich massieren.
I have someone massage me…. sounds odd and demanding
I get a massage… this is how the German sentence feels.

richtig: z.B. im Hotel: I am going to get/have a massage.

Ich lasse mich scheiden.
I get a divorce.

richtig: I am getting a divorce.

Kann ich mir Mandelmilch verschreiben lassen?
Can I have almond milk prescribed to me? (lit)
Can I get a prescription for almond milk?

Die Kritiken lassen auf einen guten Film hoffen.

vielleicht auf Englisch: Film/Movie Critics hopeful movie will live up to its potential. oder: Reviews look hopeful that movie will live up to its potential.

Das Ergebnis kann sich sehen lassen.

richtig: The results speak for themselves. oder: You can see the results with your own eyes.

Thomas lässt sich nicht aus der Ruhe bringen.

richtig: Thomas doesn’t let himself get worked up. oder: Thomas doesn’t let anything faze him. oder: Nothing fazes Thomas.

Echte Männer lassen shoppen

vielleicht auf Englisch: Real men don’t go shopping (don’t shop). (Das gilt nicht für alle Männer!)

berlingrabers

Your corrections are mostly fine as far as they go, but not really necessary. There’s nothing wrong with using the simple present in sentences with no broader grammatical or situational context.

I think you kind of missed the point on the film review one; the meaning is basically that the reviews are promising, nothing about potential. Emanuel’s translation works fine. Similarly with Thomas not being fazed – your first two suggestions just translate “lassen” as though it meant “let” here, but it doesn’t really. The third one is right, but I don’t see it as an improvement over what’s in the post.

alexviajero
alexviajero

Nice job in clarifying the “corrections” which aren’t really corrections but suggestions on how to express some things a bit differently. The “Hello everyone” salutation is how all the articles begin, and it has a friendly, familiar, and welcoming vibe to it that I’d hate to see change! I’ve noticed quite a few times on this blog where in the comments, people try to be helpful in offering corrections to the English, when the English is already just fine, and they’re really just offering stylistic preferences that don’t improve or correct anything — they just change the wording to another perfectly correct form. I had a boss once who was otherwise a great boss, but when she’d review a document I’d written, she’d make “corrections/changes” which didn’t correct anything but just rephrased things the way she’d have written them. It was a minor thing but it used to drive me crazy ;-).

I listened to the Michel Thomas German course sometime ago, and while not the magic bullet it advertises itself to be, it was actually quite useful and interesting (and his approach is a lot like yours, Emanuel, in that he elaborates on word origins, evolutions in meanings, and relationships to English words where they shared the same origins or related meanings. Anyway, he has a chapter on the word, “lassen” which was very enlightening, but this article is even better. The explanation about how certain constructs actually have two direct objects, and one or both can be eliminated (but are still implied) caused a light bulb to go on above my head. That notion makes it much clearer for me to use “lassen” correctly and with a lot more confidence. Many thanks!

Karen Martinez
Karen Martinez

I find this page so interesting. Greetings from Mexico :)

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Dein letzter Satz ist meiner Meinung nach keine gute Entsprechung. Der Nebensinn, dass jemand anders doch shoppen geht, geht verloren.

Love God
Love God

Ich hatte einmal eine Freundin gefragt, ob ihr Freund mich anrufen könnte.
Ich versucht zu sagen, “have your boyfriend call me” und sie hatte mich nicht verständen. Meine Worte waren “lass deinen Freund mich anrufen”
würde es in diesem Fall “lass deinen Freund mich anrufen” oder “lass mich deinen Freund anrufen”, weil das sehr sehr verwirrend ist…

Ich bin Amerikanerin. Deutsch ist nicht meine Muttersprache, aber ich würde sagen: “Dein Freund soll mich anrufen.” ODER???

Die Kritiken lassen auf einen guten Film hoffen.

vielleicht auf Englisch: Film/Movie Critics (are) hopeful movie will live up to its potential. oder: Film reviews look hopeful that the movie will live up to its potential.

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Haha, das ist ein echt interessanter Fall.
Lass mich deinen Freund anrufen. – Das klingt in der Tat so, dass du den Freund später anrufst.
Lass deinen Freund mich anrufen. – Das ist etwa “Lass mich von deinem Freund angerufen werden”. Oder zumindest ist es so nach meinem zugegebenermaßen noch nicht völlig entwickelten Sprachgefühl.

jag041
jag041

haha ok
Ich weiß nur, dass man immer das Pronomen vor dem anderen Nomen stellen soll, oder zumindest habe ich das gedacht. Ich will so nahe nach einem Muttersprachler (oder mindestens nach mir als Muttersprachler… wenn das Sinn macht…) wie möglich klingen, und weiß schon, dass man das irgendwie anderes sagen kann.

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Na ja, es ist so, dass im ersten Fall das Pronomen dem Verb “lassen” gehört.
Lass wen? Lass mich. Lass was tun? Freund anrufen.
Im 2.Fall:
Lass wen? Deinen Freund. Was? Anrufen. Wen anrufen? Mich.

Ähnlich ist es, wenn wir ein Pronomen in “Haare schneiden lassen” einfügen.
Man sagt ja:
Ich lass meine Frau mir die Haare schneiden.
nicht:
*Ich lass mir meine Frau die Haare schneiden.

Oder?

Love God
Love God

Hello everyone,

and welcome to our German Word of the Day.

Man kann diesen Satz nicht so stehen lassen. Richtig ist: Hello everyone, Welcome to our German Word of the Day.

Man kann auch auf Englisch schreiben: “Hello (everyone) and welcome to our German Word of the Day! This time we will…….” Man kann “everyone” weglassen. (the word “everyone” can be omitted)

Oh and just to add to that… of course “having someone else do it” does also imply that you don’t do it yourself. So in a way it does mean that real men “leave shopping”. It just doesn’t feel like that. It really feels like “Hey please do my shopping” (sorry for the flood of comments :)

Als Amerikanerin verstehe ich nicht: “It just doesn’t feel like that. It really fells like…..” Was willst Du damit sagen? Vorher hast Du das Wort “imply” verewndet. Das ist schon richtig! Auf Englisch kann man auch sagen: What the sentence is trying to say (imply/infer) …… aber nicht “feel”. Auf keinen Fall!! Man kann auch sagen: “So in a way it does mean that real men leave shopping to women, but it is not the way it is communicated/conveyed in the English language.”

Auf Englisch kann man sagen: “Real men leave the shopping to someone else.” (hauptsächlich Frauen) aber nicht nur: Real men leave the shopping. Das ergibt absolut keinen Sinn!

berlingrabers

Als Amerikaner verstehe ich sofort und komplett was er mit “feel” meint.

There’s a difference between what the sentence “implies” and what the hearer takes it to mean. The emphasis there is on an intuitive sense of the sentence’s meaning on the part of the hearer, and I think “feel” works just fine to describe that. I’d certainly use “feel” without hesitation to explain why I might choose one English phrasing over another.

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ads

A super amazing article, thank you!!!

I have a question about one of the sentence constructions:

>>>Mich hat heute im Supermarkt jemand vorgelassen…. voll nett.
>>>Someone let me go ahead in the supermarket line today… so nice

Why wouldn’t it be “Jemand hat mich heute im Supermarkt vorgelassen” instead?
Would my sentence even make sense to a german native speaker?
There seems to be a rule I seem to have totally missed. For a english native, if I heard “Mich hat heute im Supermarkt jemand vorgelassen”, I’d be thinking they just said “I had let someone go ahead in the supermarket today” which would be a totally wrong interpretation.

Miles
Miles

Vielen Dank! Habe lange drauf gewartet!

German Learner
German Learner

Viele Dank! Du hast sicher uns warten gelassen. Aber das warten lohnt sich.

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Ein hervorragender Beitrag. Wirst du zukünftig auch die Vergangenheitsform behandeln (ich habe etwas tun lassen)?
Auch die Kasusauswahl (Dativ oder Akkusativ?) bringt manche in Verlegenheit (bei mir war es vor Kurzem auch so).

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Wie wärs mit folgendem Beispielsatz:
Der Zauberer ließ den Mann dessen Bierglas fallen lassen?

Love God
Love God

@berlingrabers

Als Amerikaner verstehe ich sofort und komplett was er mit “feel” meint.

There’s a difference between what the sentence “implies” and what the hearer takes it to mean. The emphasis there is on an intuitive sense of the sentence’s meaning on the part of the hearer, and I think “feel” works just fine to describe that. I’d certainly use “feel” without hesitation to explain why I might choose one English phrasing over another.

So in a way it does mean that real men “leave shopping”. It just doesn’t feel like that. It really feels like “Hey please do my shopping”

Klar, wenn man den Satz so ausdrückt: “So in a way it does mean that real men leave shopping (hier muss man “to someone else” hinzfügen). The sentence just doesn’t feel (sound) right like that (meaning: when it is said this way). Man sagt nicht: “It just doesn’t feel like that.” (als ob man über sein Gefühl spricht: It just does not feel that way for me.) Ich würde sagen: It sounds like “Hey please do my shopping.

Die Kritiken lassen auf einen guten Film hoffen.

vielleicht auf Englisch: Film/Movie Critics (are) hopeful movie will live up to its potential.
Ich glaube schon, dass den Deutschen Satz entspricht das Leistungsvermögen des Films. Wenn nicht, was bedeutet denn der Satz? Vielleicht: Film/Movie Critics expect the film/movie to be good.

Übrigens, man kann nicht auf English einfach sagen: “I get divorced.” (gebrochenes Englisch) Entweder: Every time I get married, it ends in divorce oder: I get divorced. “I am getting divorced.” bedeutet: Ich bin verheiratet und jetzt lasse mich scheiden.

Es gibt einen Unterschied zwischen: I am getting/having a massage at the spa at 3:00 p.m. today. und: I get a massage every time I go to the spa.

Wenn ich mit jemandem rede, würde ich nicht nur sagen: “I get a massage (Punkt).” Für mich ist das gebrochene Englisch. Der Satz ist nicht vollständig. Man gibt nur schlechten Gewohnheiten weiter.

Ich wünsche Euch, noch einen schönen Feiertag!

berlingrabers

There’s a difference between what YOU would say and what one can meaningfully say. An intuitive understanding of a sentence’s meaning(s) is hardly that different from an emotional response, so at worst “feel” is being used more metaphorically than you’d like.

No, the potential of the film and the critics’ own expectations are entirely absent from the sentence as it stands (die Kritiken, not die Kritiker). Those things could be implied, but the focus is on the effect the reviews have on the speaker’s expectations:

– lit: The reviews let/allow [one to] hope for a good film.

That is, they don’t exclude the possibility that the film is good and in fact give us (the readers) reason to expect that it is. “The reviews are promising” is the most idiomatic translation I can come up with, but the translation in the post conveys the sense of “hoffen lassen” better than that.

As for the present simple in the examples, you’re importing all the context. You might never say “I get divorced” or “I get a massage” in conversation, but that doesn’t make the sentences ungrammatical or even not plausible as lines of dialogue:

– What’s the first thing you do after you check in for your spa weekend at the resort?
– I get a massage.

But there’s no such context in the examples. The whole point there is that “sich scheiden lassen” means “get divorced,” so the sentence just needs to be a grammatically correct translation of a German use of the verb phrase to do its job, and by golly it is.

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

“Ich glaube schon, dass den Deutschen Satz entspricht das Leistungsvermögen des Films.”

Meintest du wahrscheinlich: “… dass das Leistungsvermögen des Films dem deutschen Satz entspricht”?

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Offtopic: auf meinem Sprachniveau finde ich die deutsche Wortbildung immer noch problematisch. Es gibt ja keine festen regeln für das Zusammensetzen deutscher Wörter, und obwohl es bestimmte Tendenzen gibt, kommt vieles auf das reine Sprachgefühl an. Die Deutschen sind in der Lage, ganz unbewusst die Fugenelemente wie -s- oder -en- einzufügen, sie wissen auch, welche Wörter nicht zueinander passen. Deswegen sieht man in deutschen – insbesondere wissenschaftlichen oder philosophischen – Texten viele “Neuschöpfungen”, deren Bedeutung allen klar ist, trotz der Tatsache, dass sie in keinem Wörterbuch vorkommen. Für Nichtmuttersprachler stellt das, glaube ich, ein Riesenproblem dar. Ich werde von jetzt an versuchen, mehr von solchen Zusammensetzungen zu verwenden, und ich würde dankbar, wenn du mich korrigieren würdest, falls ich eine falsche Zusammensetzung einsetze.

Ich nehme an, dass es nicht genügt, Wörter bloß “richtig” zu verketten. Die Gebräuchlichkeit kommt auch ins Spiel. Ein vielleicht blödes Beispel folgt.

Es gibt verschiedene Wortbildungsmechanismen bzw. -muster. Einer davon ist “Verbstamm + Substantiv”.

liegen + Stuhl = Liegestuhl
drehen + Stuhl = Drehstuhl
stehen + Stuhl = Stehstuhl
und sogar
rennen + Stuhl = Rennstuhl (hehe)

Also, ich kenne jetzt das Muster und ich merke, dass es verschiedene Arten Verbote gibt:

rauchen + Verbot = Rauchverbot
parken + Verbot = Parkverbot

Ich kenne auch diese Schilder mit “Betreten verboten!”. Logischerweise:

betreten + Verbot = Betretverbot

Google bestätigt: das Wort gibt es eigentlich (neben der alternativen, fast ungebräuchlichen Form “Betrittverbot”). So weit, so gut. Jetzt erinnere ich mich daran, dass es auch Schilder gibt mit “Bekleben verboten!”. Ich suche natürlich nach “Beklebverbot”, doch Google lässt mich leer ausgehen. Kein einziger Treffer.

Trotzdem möchte ich fragen: ist das Wort an sich verständlich? Hört es sich komisch an, oder vielleicht normal trotz der Ungebräuchlichkeit? Wenn nein, gerate ich wahrscheinlich in temporäre Verzweiflung wegen der Undurchsichtlichkeit des ganzen Systems ;)

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Haha, jetzt hab ich nach “Beklebeverbot” gesucht und bin fündig geworden: 7 Treffer! Also, kaum gebräuchlich, aber…
Es lag also am Fugenelement -e-… Woher muss man so was wissen? ;)

Die Fragen über die von mir angeführte Version bleiben trotzdem offen :)

Giulia

Awesome website, great lessson!

Roland

Hallo Emanuel, danke dass du uns nicht im Stich gelassen hast, und endlich diesen lang erwarteten Artikel geschrieben hast ;) Ich hab nur eine kleine Bemerkung: wieso schreibst du immer “wanne” statt “wanna”? Ich glaub die gängige Abkürzung für “want to” ist eher das letzte :)

Amanda Burth
Amanda Burth

Hi! I was just discussing fallen lassen with my german husband and he says that it is NOT fallen gelassen in the perfect tense. Is this right?
He says “ich habe das Glas fallen lassen.” I would think that it is “ich habe das Glas fallen gelassen” Danke!

Grateful Reader
Grateful Reader

Your husband is correct. It’s hat fallen lassen.
According to canoo, the version with ge- is in principle not false, but it’s seldom used and I suppose for many Germans it will simply sound false.

http://www.canoo.net/services/OnlineGrammar/Wort/Verb/Finit-Infinit/Part2.html