Advent Calendar 6 – Indo-European Exposed

Indo-European #Exposed

Hello everyone,

day 6 of our Advent Calendar, the second Advent AND Nikolaus in Germany, and today we’ll have some quality time and watch a movie together.
Well, okay… not a movie. But still…. feel free to break out a popcorn or two :).

So… in my articles, I very often refer to Indo-European roots. But I never spoke about it specifically, mainly because I don’t know too much about it. Beside the fact that it’s very very very ancient, of course.
I’m sure some of you know a great deal more, but for the majority, Indo-European is one of these weird “It’d be really cool to learn a bit more about it”-topics. That we then never learn about. Like… they’re interesting, but then, when we decide what to watch or read while eating or driving to work or sitting in class, we never think of them.
But today’s the day, because we’ll watch neat little summary video about it.
There are plenty of videos out there, of course, but this one is pretty good.
Oh just in case you’re wondering why I’m not just writing an article about it… well, that’s because I’d also just watch a couple of videos and then paraphrase them, so we might just as well watch the original.
Let me know your thoughts and questions in the comments, Viel Spaß und bis morgen:)

Oh, if you like the video, head on over to Youtube
(click “watch on youtube” in the player window) and give him a like.

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Jinnie
Jinnie
1 year ago

I’ve recently discovered the podcast ‘The history of the English language’, which has over 140 episodes, the first ten being about the indo european origins. I don’t know if you know about it Emanuel, but I’d definitely recommend it. Episodes | The History of English Podcast

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

I want to explain that Albanian words looks like they are the root of Indo-European languages.
First example it is about word “to bear” (carry).
Corresponding word in Albanian it is “bie” which mean to ”bring”
An another example it the word “doru” = tree.
Corresponding word in Albania it is “dru” and it mean tree.
If you want to discover more probably you mast start learning Albanian

GANESH NARAYANAN
GANESH NARAYANAN
1 year ago

Hi
I found the video very interesting . I am a 5 languages speaker but the 6th der Deutsch is really diffcult ,especailly the cases . The question :what happens if you dont give value for the same .After all ,it is a foreign language. We speak or write without taking into account the cases .
GN

Leslie r. Crockett
Leslie r. Crockett
1 year ago

I have always tried to research the origins ,and changes, of english words just for the fun of it. If I start this, with german, I’ll know that this language has clicked in my head.

Anne Maxwell-Jackson
Anne Maxwell-Jackson
1 year ago

Fascinating. Really enjoyed it and shared with others. Thank you.

Randall
Randall
1 year ago

Very interesting enjoyable and informative!

Zuckerbaby
Zuckerbaby
1 year ago

Ausgezeichnet! Da ich Schülerin auf Girls’ Latin School (Boston) war, freue ich mich daß er von dem harten C in Latein spricht.

jserrano
jserrano
1 year ago

I’m Spanish, living in the Netherlands, working in English, French and German, and lucky to have friends from many different countries. The different evolution of the romance and germanic languages has always interested me, and I’m still baffled by how completely alien Finnish and Basque are compared to any other modern european languages.

I understand not everyone shares our passion for the history of the languages we speak, but to me, this is one of the aspects that makes learning foreign languages an adventure, rather than a dredge.

Thanks for investing your time and effort in these insights, they are most welcome amigo mio.

Parisbongi
Parisbongi
1 year ago
Reply to  Emanuel

I think Hungarian also fits in the “misfit” group.

DEmberton
DEmberton
1 year ago

I find all this stuff fascinating and have often spent lots of time watching the excellent Langfocus videos as well as looking up words in Dutch, Swedish, Norwiegen etc. and see how they compare with English and German and reading about the etymology. And then I think to myself: “What are you doing you idiot – you’re meant to be learning GERMAN!”.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Hi. I love etymology and find it super useful when learning. One of the reasons I follow your blog and not much else :)
I’m really surprised by that video, though. I’m French/English bilingual, alright at German, and also study (and understand) Spanish and Italian, with some Latin in the past. I see the connection with English and German, the video does a great job of showing it, but what the hell happened to those South-West European languages to make them so different from all the PIE descendants in the video?!

Jpanosky
Jpanosky
1 year ago

If you want to learn far more, check out The History of English podcast. It starts with proto-Indo European and follows language migration / development throughout Europe. I’m finding it fascinating!

Desdra
Desdra
1 year ago
Reply to  Jpanosky

Be sure to include the word podcast when searching for the title. The History of English is a different podcast. Found that out after subscribing to the wrong one. Great podcast!

PaulJ123
PaulJ123
1 year ago

I really enjoy these “word rambles” as the late John Ciardi, an American etymologist, called them in his weekly contributions to the PBS radio Morning Show.

stosselgg
stosselgg
1 year ago

Very interesting. I’d like to learn more about this.

Queene42
Queene42
1 year ago

Sorry…..but I have to agree with Amerikanerin’s first paragraph. But that being said, thank you for exposing us to it.

LCantoni
LCantoni
1 year ago

Fascinating and much appreciated. I’ve always been interested in the etymology of English words (Latin, Greek, Germanic roots, loanwords from other languages, etc.), but I haven’t often come across discussions of Indo-European roots. I had to learn German – with you – to get a better handle on that. :) Danke schön!

Dejan
Dejan
1 year ago

I am so thankful to Emanuel and to people who made it possible to learn, even when some of us are not currently in the situation to pay. Thanks for helping me make my goals come true.

Ahmad Mazaheri
Ahmad Mazaheri
1 year ago

Hallo lieber Emmanuel
Wir sind am sexte Tag des Adventskalander !
Warum die Etymologie zählt aber mit gemässigten Dose . Es geht von der Herkunft oder den Wurzeln eines Wortes an .
Heute mehr als drei milliarden Menschen benützen eine PIA ( proto-indoeuropäische) Sprache. Aus dieser Wurzel haben wir mehr als 450 Töchter Sprache auf Eurasiatische Gebieten . ES bewundert mich ein solche Vergleichbarkeit der Lauten, konsonnanten, ihren historischen Veränderung .
Wie Avestan und Sanskrit Sprachen sind Vergleichbar mit germanischen Sprachen ! Wir müssen die Linguisten/ Sprachwissenschaftlern/ Philologen wie Franz Popp, Brüdern Grim, Ferdinad de Sausure zu bedanken . In besondres muss die Lautquadralatere zu zitieren, die ganze linguistische Gesetze verkörpert.
Bis Morgen

John
John
1 year ago

This was very interesting! The discovery of Indo-European and other language families was one of the greatest accomplishments of 19th century linguistics, spearheaded in large part by the great German historical linguists of the period after the British in India discovered that Sanskrit was surprisingly similar to the Greek and Latin that they had learned in school. There are no surviving examples of Indo-European, but linguists have reconstructed it and even created a dictionary based on deep analyses of verbal changes that regularly take place in those languages that derive from this source.

Interestingly (well, to me), the failure to recognize common linguistic roots was also the cause for the idiotic “rules” so many English students learned for decades such as not to end a sentence with a preposition or not to split an infinitive. Scholars in the 18th century were embarrassed by English’s unruliness compared to Latin and French. These artificial rules stemmed from an attempt to cure what was seen as a fault. Scholars did not understand that English is Germanic in origin and carries within it the impulse to separate verbs and prepositions at certain times. The Oxford English Dictionary officially set aside the split infinitive thing in the 1990’s, though English does not have an official rulemaker like French does.

Steph
Steph
1 year ago

It’s funny because I do understand how a person could be completely bored or turned off by this, but I must be a nerd because it is absolutely fascinating to me. I love, love, love the big picture of how languages change and split into new languages. You can really get a feel for how the language is alive and how it changes to suit the needs of the current population using it. If anyone else is interested I would highly recommend the book “The Loom of Language” by Frederick Bodmer. Bit old, but full of valuable information.

coleussanctus
coleussanctus
1 year ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Funny, the sound changes are something I find interesting. Most of the time I don’t really gain anything from knowing it, and a lot of times I forget it anyway, but it’s still fun to read about. Kind of like being a pack rat for information, I guess.

Burak Tilev
Burak Tilev
1 year ago

Emmanuel danke sehr TOLL