Word of the Day

“One word says more then 1.000 grammars”
(Buddah)

Uh…. I’m not 100%  sure about this quote but what I am sure about is that words are THE key.

And here you get lots of them. Like … a LOT!!!

There are like 300+ articles here, and an article is usually not about just one word, but a whole family. Like… verbs, noun, adjectives.

We look at where they come from, why they mean what they mean and of course how to use them. All that with lots of (audio) examples and fun.
If you read all articles here, I think you’ll be familiar with like 1.500 words or so, and the most important ones, too. So jump right in :).

As I said,there’s quite a big archive so I offer different ways to go about it.
The categories gives you an impression of what to expect in terms of style and level. 

Looking at it by word type is probably the fastest way to find a particular word. And since some people have said they’d like to read it in sequence, I also have them ordered by date. Have fun :)

click to expand

 (note that many posts fit into more than one category)

A-Level

a-levelThis category gathers all the articles that should be easily understandable at a beginner’s level once you’ve learned the absolute essentials.
You might find that a certain article is too advanced for you. Don’t feel bad or stupid then… I just put it in the wrong category then. It’s not always easy to tell. If you think one really doesn’t belong here… just leave me a comment.

B-Level

b-levelAll the posts in this category are best if you’re already at an intermediate level. They’re not all super advanced but they usually contain at least some stuff that’ll sound intimidating if you’re really just a fledgling. Still, you can give a go of course :).
Also, all the stuff in here (words and grammar) is stuff you should know well at the end of a B level course.

Quick Reads

quick-reads
If you need a German quickie then these are the right articles for you. Quick, fun and all around a 1000 words. Perfect for a train ride to work or the morning number 2.

Audio Examples

audio-examples

If you want to have all examples read out – here are all the posts that have audio (I’m adding more bit by bit)

Must Have Words

This category compiles all the words that you absolutely, totally, undeniably, 100%edly haaaaave to know because they’re so useful and important.

Spoken German

spoken-german

These posts focus on the things that people use in their every day language. Colloquial expressions, slang, weird grammar, idioms… if you’re interested in this stuff, then this category is perfect for you.

Particles

particles

The infamous particles – doch, noch, schon, eben and plenty more of these short little words that Germans throw in all the time but that are hard to translate.

Prefix Verbs

Learning German without prefix verbs is like drawing with only lines… pointless. Wow, that was bad. But the stuff in this category is awesome. All about prefix verbs and prefixes, what they mean, how they work and the differences between aufmachen and raufmachen and all the others…

Differences

differences

“Verschieden vs. anders”, “wenn vs. falls”, “kennen vs wissen” – these and other pairs make almost every learner at some point wonder “What the hell is the difference.”
This category collects them all.

Broad Vocab

broad-vocabThis category gathers all the articles that are about generally useful words or words with interesting families and back stories but that aren’t really essential. If you want to be all efficient and get the stuff that really matters, then this is not the category to pick from. But it’s a rainy day and you need a fun read that broadens your vocabulary – then these articles are perfect. And hey… you can have the essentials down all you want. Having a broad, divers Wortschatz really makes all the difference.

/b/ Random

Random stuff you won’t find anywhere else.
Now headlines 14% more random – guaranteed ;)
But … I think it’s worth a look ;).

click to expand

Verbs

Style-Specials:

click to expand

[display-posts posts_per_page=”500″ order=”ASC”]
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Milind
3 years ago

This is really Informative….Thanks a Lot

daniel
Admin
daniel
4 years ago

“Lösen” scheint interessant zu sein. Tickets lösen, Probleme lösen, Schrauben lösen, Bremsen lösen, etwas in eine Flüssigkeit lösen…

daniel
Admin
daniel
4 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Not to mention prefix versions. Which I assume there are, considering… well… German…

daniel
Admin
daniel
4 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Viel Spaß! Ich freue mich darauf

Lamb
Lamb
4 years ago

I believe that German uses so many different verbs for English “to get” so a word of the day ” bekommen” maybe helpful.

Lamb
Lamb
4 years ago

“gelingen” also means to manage. Yes , not sure if it “gelingen” has a wide range of possible translations. But certainly is a tricky verb.

Lamb
Lamb
4 years ago

Not sure if its only me but one word that has always given me a mental block is the word “gelingen”. Is “gelingen” a difficult word ?

aoind
aoind
4 years ago
Reply to  Lamb

The most helpful thing I saw on gelingen was on the list of irregular verbs produced by the University of Michigen (in every respect a great online resource for learners of German).

https://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/Grammatik/Verb_Summaries/irreg_verbs_DNutting.pdf

I guess it is a “difficult” verb, or at least slightly tricky, because it is both a strong verb and, as the above list explains in a note, it is used impersonally, in a similar way to how with gefallen, “es gefällt mir” means “I like it”, “es gelang mir” means “I succeeded”.

aoind
aoind
4 years ago
Reply to  aoind

MichigAn

Ferdi
Ferdi
4 years ago

Is “immer” on your to-do list anytime soon?

Ferdi
Ferdi
4 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

According to my dictionary it can mean “always”, “every time”, “still”, “just”. For example:
immer noch – still
auf immer – for ever
immer schwerieriger – harder and harder
wann immer – any time
fangen wir immer an – let us begin
immer langsam – take it slowly

I guess I’m not seeing the connection between all these uses, or getting the essence of the word.

Ferdi
Ferdi
4 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Yes thank you!
I’m using a German – Norwegian dictionary. The last two are listed as imperative expressions, so i should probably have added an exclamation mark. Another example of the latter is: Nur immer zu!

gp140
gp140
4 years ago

Could you please have “während” as word of the day?

Anonymous
Anonymous
4 years ago

I will like to know how to unsubscribe in future if I need to do so . Thanks for making German learning very interesting for now . Appreciated. (K)

Cole Gilbert
Cole Gilbert
4 years ago

This site has been in existence for around 7 years. 7 X 365 = 2555 days X word of the day = 300+ articles. That seems about right. Click on this link for more info: https://yourdailygerman.com/2012/01/21/meaning-faulpelz/

#roastme

Cole Gilbert
Cole Gilbert
4 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

I’m going at about that clip. Well, if you don’t count the two weeks I was hospitalized from your “humour” making me facepalm so hard I gave myself a concussion. Been a member for 15 days.

kohlgilbert
kohlgilbert
4 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Woot! Now that I can be nice again (and perhaps take myself out of contention for a prize) this is the best site ever. My favorite part is the prefix verb series. It is like a curated dictionary. Love it.

Stuart Bromley
Stuart Bromley
4 years ago

Oops I’ve found it with the Da words undone. Sorry!

Stuart Bromley
Stuart Bromley
4 years ago

Hi Emanuel, really enjoying the blog and the comments that people make too. I know you are super busy right now but when you get time perhaps you could explain the usage of “Drauf” which Google translate seems to translate as “it”, but it seems to be used in dozens of phrases in many different ways and I can’t get my head around it. All the best.

Roman
Roman
4 years ago

Hi!

Thanks for the great resourse, one of the best thing I have ever seen and read ;)

You do not have something like Andriod app for that, correct?

Jane_German
Jane_German
4 years ago

If you ever need a topic to write about, I would love to get some clarity about the different meanings of Vorstellung and Ausstellung – and when to use them correctly. Thanks

ancaju
ancaju
5 years ago

Hi there! Thank you for your lovely site, I learned so much from you by now! I love all these little quirks of the german language, and discovering the different meanings.
Do you have a section already on the difference prepositions “ge” and “be” bring to the verb (bezahlt/gezahlt, bewährt/gewährt, berrechnet/gerrechnet and so on). Maybe adding “ver” and/or “er” too. I’m always in a lot of confusion when I see berrechnet, gerrechnet, errechnet, verrechnet … :O

Antoinette
Antoinette
5 years ago

Hallo Emanuel, that actually does help : ) and I think that is what my colleagues have been trying to explain to me. Thank you very, very much for that context.

It’s one thing to learn the words… but it’s quite another to learn how to use them appropriately. I feel very strongly that, if I am going to spend hours (…days, weeks, months…) learning the language, then I should learn it well. Your insight improves my chances of accomplishing that and I appreciate you very much!

It’s funny because I have a native German colleague whose role is similar to mine. I feel that our other German colleagues are really rude to him (“do it”) whereas with me, they are almost annoyingly polite. (I am an American, and they write to me mostly in English even though I really wish they would write to me more in German.) Now I can revisit that behavior with a fresh understanding that they are probably unnaturally polite with me… maybe because they are trying to say things the way an American would say them, or maybe because they feel less close to me… like I am an outsider who is doing them a favor while he is a true colleague who is just doing his job.

Also, maybe it hits on another thing… that Europeans think Americans tend to be fake friendly… if they think we overuse words like “please” then I guess that feeds into that belief.

I love words, too, Emanuel, because I think language is very human and learning language and linguistic behaviors gets right to the heart of what is truly human. That is one of the reasons why I am having so much fun learning German : ) I love how you find the pathways of how words came to mean what they mean today… I guess that is a mathematician, trying to find the logical formula for something that doesn’t seem logical at all : )

Thank you very much for your thoughtful response!

Antoinette
Antoinette
5 years ago

Hello Emanuel, thank you very, very much for all of your hard work on this project! It is extremely helpful to me! May I ask if you have ever done a WotD for “Bitte”? I tried to find one, but couldn’t. My colleagues tell me that I use “bitte” a lot when it isn’t necessary, so I am trying to find guidance on when it is / isn’t appropriate to use? So far, I understand “Take your seats, please” == appropriate. “Please find the information you requested” == not appropriate. I can’t understand the difference. I understand it so clearly when you explain nuances, which is why I am hoping you will do one on “bitte”? Many, many, many thanks! People said that I would never be able to learn German… but I couldn’t see why not? German is Easy : )

Anonymous
Anonymous
5 years ago

Could you please make JA word of the day.
Thanks

simonhchin
simonhchin
5 years ago

Just joined and love your site, man. How about the differences between “reden,” “sagen,” and “erzahlen?” My Germwoman keeps ragging on me about incorrect usage…make it stop!

Brightstar
Brightstar
5 years ago

Hi Emanuel,
I am feeling frustrated with your site!
Although I have chosen to ‘be remembered’ many times it doesn’t do it.
The when I enter the site, it doesn’t remember the document I was reading so I need start my search and this part it isn’t that easy.
For example, I’m looking for the exercise on ‘adjective endings’ I cannot find it under adjectives, I don’t remember in which month is was published and worst all I don’t remember even the title of the document. All I remember is that it is about adjectives and it has exercises!
So I need ask google to find it for me.

Is there an easy way to do searching?

I’m not complaining I am just feeling frustrated.

Regards

Brightstar

aoind
aoind
5 years ago

Hi Emanuel. Did you ever run your false-friends-ometer over the English and German versions of the word “extra”? I predict a fairly high reading. Our Au-Pair used the (English) word in two different contexts this weekend, Incorrectly so on both occasions. First time she meant “on purpose/deliberately”, second time she meant “individually/separate”. I did find these errors useful in understanding what this little word means in German however.