German Advent Calendar 6 – Quite the Opposite

Yourdailygerman Advent Calendar 

Quite The Opposite

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Hello everyone,

and welcome back to the epic Yourdailygerman Advent Calendar, today for the  6th of December. And that means in Germany it is Nikolaustag (St. Nicholas Day).
On Nikolaustag, the children wake up to little surprises stuffed into their shoes… yes, I am not kidding. As a kid, I would empty out my shoes from chocolate, oranges, nuts and fir branches and then put them on to walk to school.
But yeah, the tradition is that St. Nicholas (who is kind of like a more austere version of Santa Clause) comes by and drops a few small treats,
and so you’ll get a little treat too.
A new feature for the dictionary on this site… some of you might also call it… search function :).
So yeah… drumroll please…. ladies and gentlemen, I am happy to bring you 

Opposites

Yes, that’s right.
From now on, my dictionary will start showing the opposite for a word.
Or I should say, it will show the opposite for a MEANING.
As you know, words often have more than one meaning, or idea, as I call them.
And these ideas might have very different opposites.  first idea might have a totally different opposite than the second one.
Like for anziehen for instance..

  • anziehen (to put on clothes) – ausziehen (to take off clothes)
  • anziehen (to attract) – abstoßen (to repulse, to push away)
  • anziehen (to fasten the handbrake) – lösen (to losen the handbrake)

And in my dictionary, you can now see the opposite for each idea individually ( if it has one, of course).
Here’s how it looks:

And of course, you can also click on it to get to the entry for that word.

Now, as of now, I am only using ONE opposite per idea. So sometimes, I have to pick one of several options and there might be other words that can also express the opposite. If you come across one, I’m happy to talk about it in the comments of the entry. ‘
And another thing I have to say… the system is pretty darn new. Vitor, one of the readers here who helped me with some of the coding, and I have only finished it like a couple of weeks ago and I haven’t had much time to actually enter many opposites yet.
So yeah… lot of the obvious ones will be missing.
But I’ll gradually add more and more till everything is covered.
And by the way… we’re working on a similar feature that shows you how common each idea is so you know if it’s something you should add to your vocabulary deck…. I mean… vocabulary.

Cool. So that’s the new feature and I’m really happy with it, so I hope you like it, too.
And I’m curious how you like the dictionary in general.
It’s been about a year since I put up the first “real” version of it and I have added a ton of stuff over the last year, both entries and functions.
But I also anonymously track the search attempts that fail to get an idea what people are looking for, and we recently crossed 10.000 failed searches, so I’m not sure how satisfied you actually are.
That’s why I have prepared a little questionnaire :).
So if you have a couple of more minutes, I’d be really happy to get some feedback.
And please be honest. If it sucks, it sucks, if it’s great, it’s great.

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How often do you use my dictionary/search function?

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How satisfied are you with the search results?

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What do you like most about the dictionary?

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What would be the most important improvement for the dictionary in your opinion?

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***

Let me know in the comments if you have any additional feedback or ideas how I can improve it. Any input is welcome, really, so no worries about hurting my feelings. I can take whisky, so I’m oka… I mean, I can take criticism. That’s what I meant.
Anyway, have a great day, and I’ll see you tomorrow.

4.7 12 votes
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Desdra
Desdra
7 months ago

It would have been nice to have a ranking instead of a one choice radio button. A couple of those questions I had two things I thought were important but one was more important than the other. They were close though.

Steph
Steph
8 months ago

I wish I could step through the dictionary alphabetically, like a hardcopy dictionary. Just go on a word journey without a specific word in mind!

bluo90296
bluo90296
8 months ago

I had no idea it was a thing! I will start to use it now :)

Thutrang
Thutrang
8 months ago

I personally always look up your dictionary and it is totally awesome. I learn so much from it and the examples also the familie words that came along with it when i search for the root word. Honestly it will be even much better if you put all the examples with it and more words. But hey you did a great job in making a dictionary. It is my daily routine to sweep in and search for some new words. A huge thank you for that and the membership

Nancy
Nancy
8 months ago

Picky, picky (but I know you love this stuff): I would say I emptied my shoes “of” (not from) the treats. : )

Doc Holliday
Doc Holliday
8 months ago

The dictionary is thoughtfully constructed and very useful.

Anonymous
Anonymous
8 months ago

I would like to thank the extra payers of daily German cause because of them many including me can study for free .Who can’t pay because of various reasons.You are seriously so great

Ruth
Ruth
8 months ago

Opposites/antonyms definitely welcome, but etymology is what I like most in dictionary entries. (The dictionary version of character development?) Rare in one language to another dictionaries, but you could be a trend setter. I know you’ve been working towards a book, which I hope I haven’t missed while not paying attention for much of this year.

Brian
Brian
8 months ago

Any chance a mobile app (for either Apple or Android) will be developed for your dictionary?

Matt
Matt
8 months ago

FYI – The fancy but correctly used word for “opposite” in this context is actually “antonym.” Just trying to help. Very neat search function! Thank you!

Shilpa
Shilpa
8 months ago

Ist das Wörterbuch am google app verfügbar??

syperk
syperk
8 months ago

I’ll admit that I didn’t know that YDG had a dictionary, but I’ve never actually thought of using YDG’s built-in search to look up a word meaning. The main reason is just that it’s usually simpler to type the word into Google. If I do that for the above example “anziehen”, Google directly gives me back a set of English translations (attract, tighten, put on), and then follows that up with a set of synonyms and related words. Below that come a set of links to dictionaries and so forth with more in-depth information, including (some way down, I’m afraid) the YDG page for the word. The YDG definition page is a bit friendlier than some of the other dictionaries, but it’s not dramatically different. Note: your experience will likely be different if your primary language isn’t English!

If I want the opposite of a word, I would just type “anziehen opposite”, and Google gives me back “abstoßen”and “ausziehen”, and, amusingly, just below that, a link to this page… :)

I come to YDG for fascinating articles about grammar, word families, and usage, and for that, I think it’s a unique resource. But the straight dictionary definitions are not so different from other things out there, IMHO. Just my two pfennig.

BTW, hot tip: you can effectively search YDG directly from Google just by adding the letters “ydg” to your search. For instance “anziehen ydg” returns the YDG page as the top hit.

syperk
syperk
8 months ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Yes, I’m a bit surprised it works… Those letters do appear in the HTML source for the page, and they’re a relatively rare letter combination, so I’m guessing that adding them is just enough to bump up the Google’s ranking for your site with respect to the search query.

Theo Trost
Theo Trost
8 months ago

Stimmt das: “Zeit für einen kleine Überraschung”? Sollte es nicht “eine” sein?

Carlos Guzman
Carlos Guzman
8 months ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Yep

Elsa
Elsa
8 months ago

Hello,

Let’s do the opposite of “not-typos”:
“Santa Clause” (Santa Claus)
“pick on of several options” (pick one of several options)
“lot of obvious ones” (a lot of obvious ones)
“I also anonymously rack the search attempts” (I also anonymously track the search attempts)

I love the dictionary, but it sometimes fails to give a link to the article. The opposite feature is a great addition, as it will indeed give you an even better feel for the word you looked for in the first place, which is pretty darn useful when a word has more than one meaning – which seems to be almost every word in German :)

How common an idea or word is would also be awesome. I often find that a spend time and effort learning words that Germans rarely use in daily talk, so that other idea of yours is also great. I know coding all this stuff and adding all these words, likns, etc. is a lot of work and very time consuming, so thank you for being our Nikolaus!
Bis morgen!

Carlos Guzman
Carlos Guzman
8 months ago
Reply to  Elsa

Ironic Elsa, that you caught so many typos but not your own (“likns”). ;)

Mark
Mark
8 months ago

Danke für den Hinweis auf das Wörterbuch! Habe überhaupt nicht gewusst, dass es sowas auf dieser Seite gibt, aber das liegt an mir. Ich probiere es aus.

Flavia
Flavia
8 months ago

Great! The idea of labelling according to CEFR reference levels is a very good one, also for teachers

fairyhedgehog
fairyhedgehog
8 months ago

The opposites idea is a really good one. I didn’t know you had a dictionary, so I’m going to be able to make use of it now. I admit I mainly use DeepL, sometimes with a supplement of Google Translate, to find meanings.

Andrew
Andrew
8 months ago

The other commenters seem to have said it better, but I really like the opposites feature. I’ve always especially liked the usage notes in the entries/posts themselves, this seems like a helpful addition. Definitely for this user.

Amerikanskan
Amerikanskan
8 months ago

Great feature! Gives a much better feeling for the definition and very often, exactly what I wished other dictionaries had as I need to know what the opposite is – not necessarily an antonym, but the opposite, like in your example above.

coleussanctus
coleussanctus
8 months ago

That’s a feature I don’t think I’ve seen before in a dictionary. I think it’ll be really useful to build connections between words.

The third question was the hardest to answer. I went with the translations and usage notes, but the examples are a close second. Links to articles and word families aren’t far behind. I would add two other things: the audio right there in the entry and the formatting. A lot of times I go cross-eyed when I’m reading an online dictionary and the word has a lot of meanings. The way they’re numbered and separated here is easy on the eyes.

If I could have one wish, it would be a way to navigate the dictionary in addition to the search function. I know I’ve said that before, but I noticed that I don’t use the dictionary as much now that it goes through the search function. Sometimes I search through Google when no results come up, but other times I move on. I feel bad about that because I know I’m missing out on a lot. I used to spend a few minutes here and there just scrolling through and would have one or a couple “aha” moments from the usage notes and examples. Stuff I never thought I wanted to learn that day, but was glad I did.

As a kid, I was the weird one who read the dictionary, so I understand if I’m the odd one out on this, but I just thought I’d throw it out there.

Amerikanskan
Amerikanskan
8 months ago
Reply to  coleussanctus

Still am the one that gets “lost” in the dictionary. One word leads to another.

Ereaders are my savior: click on a word, get the definition/translation and keep the flow.

When I want to spend time getting lost in the dictionary, I go to the bookshelf and pull one out and start to durchblättern.

What’s the opposite of durchblättern?

coleussanctus
coleussanctus
8 months ago
Reply to  Amerikanskan

Das Buch zuschlagen und eine Runde zocken.

One word leads to another – yeah, exactly :)

Amerikanskan
Amerikanskan
8 months ago
Reply to  coleussanctus

Habe auch so was ausgedacht: sich auf einer Seite festbeißen/verbeißen.

Oder: sich auf einer Seite stecken bleiben/ hängen bleiben.

Oder was Ähnliches – wie deins.

coleussanctus
coleussanctus
8 months ago
Reply to  Amerikanskan

Also wie wenn man einen Text liest und jeden Satz gefühlt so 5 mal lesen muss, weil das Gehirn die Taschen gepackt hat und in den Urlaub gefahren ist. Auf Englisch nenne ich das “a******e brain”.