Advent Calendar 2019 – Patience

Patience

 

Hello everyone,

door 7 of our Advent Calendar and behind this door is another little sneak peek to my upcoming book on Prefix Verbs. This time, with a look at a noun that is very very very crucial for German learners :)

***

die Geduld

Geduld comes from the old Indo-European root *tele-. This root was about the idea of bearing, enduring and it’s also the origin of the English words tolerate and toll. Oh and the somewhat archaic English verb thole, which means something like to bear, to endure. German had its own verb dulden and Geduld is the classic ge-noun for that and originally was the ability to endure, to bear and then it slowly shifted toward a more general “ability to wait”. Or in one word: patience.
The word patience has a very similar evolution by the way, as it, too, was also about suffering in the beginning.
The word dulden is also still around, and it’s about the idea of (temporarily) accepting, letting be. And there’s erdulden, which has a bit more of a notion of suffering. But that one is pretty rare.

(un)geduldig – (im)patient(ly)
das Geduldsspiel – puzzle, waiting game

  • Geduld ist eine Tugend.
  • Patience is a virtue.
  • Maria ist sehr ungeduldig.
  • Maria is very impatient.
  • Warum duldet die Polizei die Drogendealer im Park?
  • Why do the police accept the drug dealers in the park
    (Why are they not doing anything?)

 

***

Let me know in the comments if you have any questions.
Have a great day and bis morgen :).

5 3 votes
Article Rating

Newsletter for free?!

Sign up to my epic newsletter and get notified whenever I post something new :)
(roughly once per week)

No Spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Your Thoughts and Questions

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
35 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Alan
Alan
2 years ago

weil die Polizei die Drogenbanden der Einhörner bezahlt.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago

Awesome blog.

Ahmad Mazaheri
Ahmad Mazaheri
2 years ago

TUGEND

Ahmad Mazaheri
Ahmad Mazaheri
2 years ago

Geduld ist eine Geduld ! Sagt Man . Aber wirklich ?
Die Zeit bringt Rat,wenn du Geduld hast . Frederich Schiller Zitate von Wilhelm Tell
Ich bedank mich dir über dieser tollen Episode Adentkallenders .

Californiagogirl
Californiagogirl
2 years ago

Or, Why do the police tolerate …?

Anjing
Anjing
2 years ago

Yeh, I would say ‘tolerate’ or ‘put up with’ would be most fitting here.

Martin
Martin
2 years ago

The verb “thole”, meaning to endure, is very much still in current use in Scotland.

Marian
Marian
2 years ago

Ich finde diesen Artikel sehr interessant. Als manchmal ungeduldiger Mensch, ist die Vorstellung dass Geduld etwas ertragen soll, hilfreich. Das deutsche Wort für passion/Leidenschaft ist auch so. Yay Deutsch, Sprache der Philosophen.

Turtles
Turtles
2 years ago

That’s a nice way to phrase it –> Warum duldet die Polizei die Drogendealer im Park?

I would have said

Warum erlauben die Polizei die Drogendealer,
Ihrer Aktivität Im park zu machen?

Now, Can I use “dulden” in other phrases such as “Warum duldet die Schüler seine Hausaufgabe?

Turtles
Turtles
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Well, mabye the student is rebellious lol. And this was an example. I am just taking in general context. More examples

Warum duldet der Arzt das Verhalten von dem Krankenschwester?

Warum duldet “X” “Y”.

parisbongi
parisbongi
2 years ago

Ich habe geduldig darauf gewartet! ( Interesting that the word patience is associated with your upcoming book…)
Noch einmal vielen Dank!

radwib
radwib
2 years ago

Sorry but it hurts my ears. Why do the police…

berlingrabers
berlingrabers
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Yeah, “police” is always plural in English (I think universally – definitely in AE). It’s one of those words like “Hose” and “Brille” that are confusing for learners because they’re feminine, so you’ve got the “die,” but singular in German, so you’re always using the wrong verb form with them.

RogerH
2 years ago

Is die Gedult connected to the English words “indulge” and “divulge” (and even “bulge”) and what would be the best German equivalents of these ?

Roger from “German is getting a little bit Easier” ;-)

RogerH
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Vielen Dank für Ihre Geduld ;-)

Aber http://www.dict.cc sagt :-
indulgence 93 Duldung {f}
indulgence 80 Duldsamkeit {f}
indulgence 11 Indulgenz {f}

auch Sie hatten Recht, zu sagen, dass es viele Optionen gibt, z.B.

indulgence 1642 Genuss {m}
indulgence 1175 Nachsicht {f}
indulgence 901 Schwäche {f}
indulgence 762 Gefälligkeit {f}
indulgence 137 Nachgiebigkeit {f}
indulgence 133 Schwelgen {n}
indulgence 93 Duldung {f}
relig.indulgence 93 Ablass {m} [kath.]
indulgence 80 Duldsamkeit {f}
indulgence 80 Einwilligung {f}
indulgence 62 Milde {f}
indulgence [action or fact of indulging] 52 Frönen {n} [geh.]
indulgence [thing indulged in] 52Luxus {m}
indulgence 32 Schwelgerei {f}
relig.indulgence 31 Ablaß {m} [alt]
relig.indulgence 21 Ablassbrief {m}
indulgence 11 Indulgenz {f}
relig.spec.indulgence [indulgentia paschalis] 7 Gnadenbezeigung {f}

Gott segne Emanuel

Auch in der Schule habe ich gelernt :-

Emanuel bedeutet “Gott mit uns”. :-) :-) :-)

Rohrkrepierer ‐ KOOK & HECKLER
Rohrkrepierer ‐ KOOK & HECKLER
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Alle Jahre wieder ‐‐
Got mittens??

berlingrabers
berlingrabers
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Jup, “El” ist einer der verschiedenen Namen bzw. Titel für Gott. Es bedeutet in etwa “der Mächtige”.

עִם “´im” heißt “mit”, mit personalem Suffix (1. Person plural) עִמָּנוּ “´immanu” + “‘el” = עִמָּנוּ אֵל “Immanu El” bzw. Immanuel. Eigentlich ein vollständiger Satz auf Althebräisch, denn das “sein”-Verb wird oft ausgelassen in einfachen Sätzen – man kann es entweder als “Gott mit uns” oder “Gott ist mit uns” verstehen (Letzteres kommt bspw. in Jesaja 8,10 vor).

Ich nehme an, die Schreibweise “Emanuel” kommt aus den romanischen Sprachen.

Jetzt weißte Bescheid :)

Jake
Jake
2 years ago

Wo ist denn eigentlich das Buch? Das duldet keinen Aufschub mehr!

Nur ein Scherz, ich will dir ja keinen Druck machen.

Jake
Jake
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Ha, danke!

Nancy
Nancy
2 years ago
Reply to  Emanuel

Please explain Jake’s use of “ja” in that sentence (if you have time). Is it something like the (American) English throw-in phrase: “for sure”? It drives me crazy; so often I know I should be throwing in some seemingly random little word (mal? eben? ja? etc.) but I don’t know which one so I (wisely, I’m sure) don’t dare. Obviously I am no Muttersprachlerin. Haha.